Lang Elliott – Music of Nature tracks on Soundclound

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Delayed Spring - A Binaural Podcast by Lang Elliott
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

Delayed Spring — A Binaural Podcast by Lang Elliott The great warbler migration is upon us here in Ithaca, on this fine warm day of May 3rd. But the ten days between my last blog post and today were not the greatest, weather-wise or bird-wise, with lots of cold days, freezing nights, rain and wind. It even snowed one afternoon! Nonetheless, I gathered recordings of 21 species on four different days and I've put together this new podcast ... Delayed Spring ... to celebrate what I found. About twenty minutes long, the podcast features quite a number of deliciously spacious binaural soundscape recordings. So, if you listen with headphones or earbuds, you may very well think you're out in nature with me, fully immersed in the 3D sound environment. Note that I've made a special effort to include long intervals where you just hear the sounds of nature, rather than me gabbing about it all. What follows is a list of the 21 species featured, roughly in the order in which they are presented in my podcast: Wood Frog, Spring Peeper, Blue Jay, Whie-throated Sparrow, Swamp Sparrow, Black-capped Chickadee, Dark-eyed Junco, Louisiana Waterthrush, Hermit Thrush, Eastern Phoebe, Blue-headed Vireo, Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, Belted Kingfisher, Mallard, Yellow-rumped Warbler (I think), Eastern Towhee, Field Sparrow, Red-winged Blackbird, Downy Woodpecker, Northern Mockingbird, and American Toad. I hope you enjoy the show!

Nature Recordings
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Voices of the Night Binaural Compilation
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

“Voices of the Night” — A Compilation of Binaural Recordings by Lang Elliott, for an acousmatic presentation at a conference in Cagliari, Sardinia, Italy in mid-May 2018. Please listen using headphones! Artist’s Statement: I have created this sequence of five binaural nature recordings as an experiment, to see how well they are spatialized using sound diffusion processing. I have no experience with acousmatic presentations, so this should be interesting. Below are descriptions of the five recordings. 1. Coyote Song: It is early May. We are in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in Tennessee. Just before dawn, several coyotes sound off near a gently gurgling mountain brook, their lovely howls echoing across a broad meadow surrounded by forest. 2. Beaver Pond: It is early September in the rolling hills of upstate New York. We spend the night in the forest, camping next to a small beaver pond. Crickets trill, frogs peep, owls hoot, and beaver make occasional splashing sounds. Such a rich and varied mixture of wilderness sounds! 3. Ontario Wavescape: Exploring the shore of Lake Ontario, we stand atop a cliff and enjoy the rhythmic sound of the waves washing-in. At the bottom of the cliff is a small, cave-like hollow. Waves washing into the hollow make a very low frequency whomp! or thump! that we feel deep inside our bodies. 4. Wind in the Pines: At dusk, wind blows through the Florida pine woods. Crickets trill and chirp. The wind rises and falls, changing directions as if uncertain of its destination. A lone Chuck-will’s-widow sounds off repeatedly from distant ground perches, its resonant songs adding depth and breadth to the soundscape. 5. Virginia Thunderstorm: It is spring in the Appalachian Mountains of Virginia. At dusk, a thunderstorm blows our way. Soon it is raining. We watch the lightning bolts, many of which have horizontal arms that reach across the sky. The thunder seems to travel miles from its origins, gradually disappearing into the distance with striking variations of intensity along its paths. It as if giant boulders are rolling thunderously toward the horizon, their rumbles echoing off the surrounding hills.

Nature Recordings
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Backyard Bird Walk Podcast
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

An impromptu podcast featuring nature recordings I made in my backyard on April 22, 2018. I used a Telinga stereo parabola. The Story: I got up early on Sunday (April 22) to see how many birds I could record with my trusty parabolic microphone. I was expecting perhaps a dozen or so, given the difficulty of getting decent recordings. As it turns out, I ended up recording a whopping 26 species … 24 birds, 1 frog and 1 mammal, all found in my own backyard (I never left our property). Luckily, we have a number of habitats, which helps for sure, including: a pond with some cattails, grassy meadows, lots of shrubby edges, an overgrown field, and forest. Returning to my studio the next day, I set about editing the recordings and throwing together a narrative, which I performed off-the-cuff, without writing down any script. I rather like the result … uncomplicated, straightforward, and without too much talking. I was lucky to have gotten so many recordings, which makes for a compelling little bird walk, so suitable for celebrating the dawn chorus on an early spring day.

Nature Recording
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Winter Windstorm
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

This 24-minute wonderfully immersive binaural recording features a mid-winter windstorm with gusting and light snow in a dense stand of Norway Spruce. I set my soundscape microphone near a small meltwater stream. Listen for the gentle gurgle of the brook (revealed when the wind subsides)set against windy intervals where at times you can hear the crackle of spruce limbs hitting one another as the trees bend and sway. Listen also for the deep low-frequency rumble made by the wind roaring over and down the mountainside. Recorded 2pm, 28 February 2018 in Shindagin Hollow near Brooktondale, New York.

Nature Recording
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Hickory Mound Meadow
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

Enjoy this lovely binaural springtime soundscape from one of my favorite locations in nearby Finger Lakes National Forest. I call it "Hickory Mound Meadow" because of a large mound (maybe an old root cellar) at the site of an old homestead. Please listen using headphones! It had rained the night before, and the rushing gurgle of a meadow freshet is dominated. A variety of birds are heard, including House Wren, Northern Cardinal, Baltimore Oriole, Yellow Warbler, Red-winged Blackbird, Mourning Dove, and more. Recorded 10 May 2016 at around 7am. Finger Lakes National Forest near Trumansburg, New York.

Nature Recording
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Meadow After Rain
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

Light rain falls upon an overgrown meadow shortly after sunrise. Rivulets wind across the clearing, draining excess water from the receding storm. The sun, peeping through the clouds, throws a broad beam of light across the clearing as birds burst into song in excited anticipation of the coming day. Set in upstate New York in late May, this is one of my favorite binaural soundscapes. It is unusually immersive (please use headphones!), with the pitter-patter of light rain and the gurgling of streamlets providing a soothing backdrop against which the bird music spreads out in all directions. I could listen to this for minutes on end, imagining that I am standing at the edge of the meadow, protected under the canopy of a large tree. Many species can be heard, some from the surrounding forest. Listen in particular for the quickening down-slurred whistles of Field Sparrows, the staccato fitz-bew of a Willow Flycatcher, the lively witchety-witchey of a Common Yellowthroat, the cheery warbles of an Eastern Bluebird (at times), the mournful coos of a Mourning Dove, the thumping drums of at least two Ruffed Grouse, the musical song of a Rose-breasted Grosbeak, the soft trilling of crickets, and finally the throaty caws of crows way off in the distance.

Nature Recording
1,474
Meltwater Dawn Chorus
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

A relaxing dawn chorus featuring a softly gurgling brook and the songs of American Robin, Hermit Thrush and Dark-eyed Junco. Recorded in a wet grassy meadow in the high country of Oregon's Cascade Mountains. 6:30am, 20 June 2017, along the McKenzie Scenic Highway. NOTE: this is a binaural recording. Please use headphones for a realistic 3D listening experience.

Nature Recording
1,570
Meltwater Melodies - Podcast
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

"Meltwater Melodies" is an 11-minute long binaural podcast by Lang Elliott. Please use headphones for a superb 3D listening Experience. In this podcast, I share my recording adventures while visiting the Three Sisters Wilderness Area in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon during the summer of 2017.

Nature Recording
1,393
Wind Over the Ridge
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

Don your headphones and join me on a windy ridge in Great Smoky Mountains National Park! Listen and enjoy a full 15-minutes of soothing binaural immersion featuring a panoply of bird songs typical of high altitude spruce-fir forest in the southern Appalachian(be sure to listen using headphones … otherwise it may sound like a bunch of noise!). It was mid-May in the year 2000. I was traveling in an old Chevy van and had just spent the night on the ridge. I rose at the break of dawn and was disappointed at all the wind. Deciding not to be stymied, I ventured into the spruce-fir stand and soon homed-in on a Winter Wren, singing excitedly from a low branch. I quickly set up my soundscape microphone, placed it in a special homemade "wind box," and then hit record. I'm quite pleased with this spacious soundscape. It features the songs and calls of a number of birds, plus a mammal sound. At the beginning, note the prominent songs of a Winter Wren and a Black-capped Chickadee, followed over time by the caws of American Crows, scratching sounds of a Red Squirrel, the squeaky songs of a Gray Catbird, the rising zhree-zhree-zhree-zeeee of a Black-throated Blue Warbler, the sprightly pleased, pleased, pleased t'meet'cha! of a Chestnut-sided Warbler, and finally the soft musical whistles of a Robin. Recorded 7am, 18 May 2000, along trail to Clingman's Dome.

Nature Recording
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A Most Beautiful Robin
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

During all my travels, I'm constantly on the lookout (or rather, "earout") for the most beautiful robin song. Over the years, I've gathered dozens of binaural soundscapes featuring this delicacy, and some are quite nice to behold. But I do believe that the song I recorded at Cranberry Glades Botanical Area (in the mountains of West Virginia) in late May of the year 2000 is the finest of them all. Please Listen Using Headphones! Recorded at 7:15am, 29 May 2000, Cranberry Glades Botanical Area near Raintown, West Virginia. © Lang Elliott. Special thanks to Marie Read (marieread.com) for use of her splendid photo of a singing robin in a red maple tree.

Nature Recording
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Wood Thrushes Countersinging
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

Here is a lovely 6.5 minute soundscape that I just uncovered … two Wood Thrushes singing back-and-forth at dawn, recorded at Land Between the Lakes Kentucky way back in 1995, about the time I began gathering binaural soundscapes. I rather like it and think it’s a powerful reminder of things to come Yep, SPRING is just around the corner. Believe me! It’s a busy dawn chorus for sure, but if played at a medium to low sound level, it’s fairly gentle on the ears. The recording also features the incessant singing of distant Whip-poor-wills, Barred Owls hooting, Mourning Doves cooing, a woodpecker drumming (probably a Hairy Woodpecker), and plenty more species for the discerning ear.

Nature Recording
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Flycatcher Bend (Aravaipa Canyon Soundscape)
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

A binaural soundscape featuring Southwestern Willow Flycatchers. Recorded 15 May 2017 in Aravaipa Canyon, on Arizona Nature Conservancy property near the east boundary of the Aravaipa Canyon Wilderness area in southeastern Arizona. According to the Conservancy staff, this is the first documentation of the species on their property. The photo shows the habitat. At least two individuals were singing from a large stand of willows and other hardwoods near a patch of cattails along Aravaipa Creek. The Southwestern Willow Flycatcher, Empidonax traillii extimus, is a subspecies of the Willow Flycatcher and is currently listed as endangered by the US Fish and Wildlife Service. Here's what our federal government has to say about it: "Best known for its unique “fitz-bew” call, the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher depends on the riparian and wetland habitats in this arid region. The bird serves as an indicator of this unique landscape, where water is so crucial. It’s the lifeblood of the desert southwest with hundreds of species depending on it for survival. Lush vegetation surrounding rivers and streams in this region harbor hundreds of different wildlife species, rivaling the Amazon’s rainforests in biodiversity. Because of loss and fragmentation of habitat, largely caused by surface water diversion, groundwater pumping and the spread of invasive plants, the bird's numbers have plummeted. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) declared the species endangered in 1995. But stewardship-minded landowners from across the Southwest have stepped up and are helping the bird and many other wildlife species by voluntarily restoring and improving the health of the region’s riparian ecosystems." Above quote from: https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/detail/national/programs/financial/whip/?cid=stelprdb1047041

Nature Recording
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Aravaipa Spotted Owl (Aravaipa Canyon Nightscape)
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

A binaural soundscape featuring the hoots and screams of a Mexican Spotted Owl, including an extended distant interaction at the end. Recorded 23 May 2017 at night along the dry Turkey Creek, a tributary of Aravaipa Creek at the western boundary of the Aravaipa Canyon Wilderness Area in Arizona. © 2017 Lang Elliott, musicofnature.com. Please Listen Using Headphones! I was fortunate to get this spacious binaural recording. The Mexican Spotted Owl is a subspecies of the Spotted Owl (Stix occidentalis lucida). It is considered a threatened species by both the U.S. and Mexican governments, and is considered threatened in Colorado, Utah, and the Navajo Nation, and a Species of Concern in Arizona and New Mexico. How did I get it? Well, by setting my microphone in the dry creek bed and letting it run all night long. At around 3am, when the insect chorus was quite subdued, the owl began hooting. I lay fast asleep in my tent and therefore missed the entire performance.

Nature Recording
461
Aravaipa Deersnorts (Aravaipa Canyon Nightscape)
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

An engaging binaural soundscape featuring a White-tailed Deer snorting, stomping and bounding away in the dark of the night. Includes songs of a Yellow-breasted Chat and a backdrop of chirping and trilling crickets . Recorded 24 May 2017 in Turkey Creek, a dry tributary of Aravaipa Creek at the eastern boundary of Aravaipa Canyon Wilderness Area in Arizona. © Lang Elliott, musicofnature.com Please listen using headphones! The crickets are a bit overwhelming to my ear, but note that I've already done my best to reduce their loudness without compromising the sounds made by the deer.

Nature Recording
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Chat Nightsong #2 (Aravaipa Canyon Nightscape)
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

A Yellow-breasted Chat singing at night along Turkey Creek (dry at this season), a tributary of Aravaipa Creek in Aravaipa Canyon in southeastern Arizona. 16 May 2017. © Lang Elliott. Chats are common in many parts of Arizona. Males often sing at night and I'm always trying to capture a great example. This chat was recorded in a dry canyon and features a slow-paced night-song set against a pleasing chorus of crickets. It's a favorite in that the male's song seems a bit less raucous than many other chats I've recorded.

Nature Recording
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Chat Nightsong #1 (Aravaipa Canyon Nightscape)
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

A Yellow-breasted Chat singing at night along Aravaipa Creek in Aravaipa Canyon in southeastern Arizona. 29 April 2017. © Lang Elliott. Chats are common in many parts of Arizona. Males often sing at night and I'm always trying to capture a great example. I like this one a lot, with the chat's raucous night-song set against the gurgle of Aravaipa Creek. I wonder what listener's will think of this recording. It is somewhat minimalistic, in the sense that it involves only two sound objects, the chat and the stream. Nonetheless, it is pleasurable to me perhaps in part because I'm familiar with the chat and really appreciate its night-song, even though the chat is clearly not a melodic singer. For me, chat+stream, recorded binaurally, produces a compelling and enjoyable soundscape that (I think) captures the essence of the chat's unusual night-time performance.

Nature Recording
187
Chat's Domain (Aravaipa Canyon Waterscape)
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

A binaural dawn chorus soundscape featuring a number of songbirds set against the gurgle of Aravaipa Creek. Particularly prominent are the songs of a Yellow Breasted Chat and a Northern Cardinal. The gobble of a Wild Turkey can be heard in the background. Recorded 30 April 2017 on Nature Conservancy property at the eastern edge of the Aravaipa Canyon Wilderness Area in southeastern Arizona. Please Listen Using Headphones!

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Dawn Chorus (Aravaipa Canyon Waterscape)
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

A binaural dawn chorus soundscape featuring the gurgles of two riffles along a bend in Aravaipa Creek. Recorded 17 May 2017 on Nature Conservancy property near the eastern edge of the Aravaipa Canyon Wilderness Area in southeastern Arizona.

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