Lang Elliott – Music of Nature tracks on Soundclound

#musicofnature

Meltwater Dawn Chorus
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

A relaxing dawn chorus featuring a softly gurgling brook and the songs of American Robin, Hermit Thrush and Dark-eyed Junco. Recorded in a wet grassy meadow in the high country of Oregon's Cascade Mountains. 6:30am, 20 June 2017, along the McKenzie Scenic Highway. NOTE: this is a binaural recording. Please use headphones for a realistic 3D listening experience.

Nature Recording
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Meltwater Melodies - Podcast
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

"Meltwater Melodies" is an 11-minute long binaural podcast by Lang Elliott. Please use headphones for a superb 3D listening Experience. In this podcast, I share my recording adventures while visiting the Three Sisters Wilderness Area in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon during the summer of 2017.

Nature Recording
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Wind Over the Ridge
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

Don your headphones and join me on a windy ridge in Great Smoky Mountains National Park! Listen and enjoy a full 15-minutes of soothing binaural immersion featuring a panoply of bird songs typical of high altitude spruce-fir forest in the southern Appalachian(be sure to listen using headphones … otherwise it may sound like a bunch of noise!). It was mid-May in the year 2000. I was traveling in an old Chevy van and had just spent the night on the ridge. I rose at the break of dawn and was disappointed at all the wind. Deciding not to be stymied, I ventured into the spruce-fir stand and soon homed-in on a Winter Wren, singing excitedly from a low branch. I quickly set up my soundscape microphone, placed it in a special homemade "wind box," and then hit record. I'm quite pleased with this spacious soundscape. It features the songs and calls of a number of birds, plus a mammal sound. At the beginning, note the prominent songs of a Winter Wren and a Black-capped Chickadee, followed over time by the caws of American Crows, scratching sounds of a Red Squirrel, the squeaky songs of a Gray Catbird, the rising zhree-zhree-zhree-zeeee of a Black-throated Blue Warbler, the sprightly pleased, pleased, pleased t'meet'cha! of a Chestnut-sided Warbler, and finally the soft musical whistles of a Robin. Recorded 7am, 18 May 2000, along trail to Clingman's Dome.

Nature Recording
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A Most Beautiful Robin
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

During all my travels, I'm constantly on the lookout (or rather, "earout") for the most beautiful robin song. Over the years, I've gathered dozens of binaural soundscapes featuring this delicacy, and some are quite nice to behold. But I do believe that the song I recorded at Cranberry Glades Botanical Area (in the mountains of West Virginia) in late May of the year 2000 is the finest of them all. Please Listen Using Headphones! Recorded at 7:15am, 29 May 2000, Cranberry Glades Botanical Area near Raintown, West Virginia. © Lang Elliott. Special thanks to Marie Read (marieread.com) for use of her splendid photo of a singing robin in a red maple tree.

Nature Recording
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Wood Thrushes Countersinging
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

Here is a lovely 6.5 minute soundscape that I just uncovered … two Wood Thrushes singing back-and-forth at dawn, recorded at Land Between the Lakes Kentucky way back in 1995, about the time I began gathering binaural soundscapes. I rather like it and think it’s a powerful reminder of things to come Yep, SPRING is just around the corner. Believe me! It’s a busy dawn chorus for sure, but if played at a medium to low sound level, it’s fairly gentle on the ears. The recording also features the incessant singing of distant Whip-poor-wills, Barred Owls hooting, Mourning Doves cooing, a woodpecker drumming (probably a Hairy Woodpecker), and plenty more species for the discerning ear.

Nature Recording
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Aravaipa Spotted Owl (Aravaipa Canyon Nightscape)
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

A binaural soundscape featuring the hoots and screams of a Mexican Spotted Owl, including an extended distant interaction at the end. Recorded 23 May 2017 at night along the dry Turkey Creek, a tributary of Aravaipa Creek at the western boundary of the Aravaipa Canyon Wilderness Area in Arizona. © 2017 Lang Elliott, musicofnature.com. Please Listen Using Headphones! I was fortunate to get this spacious binaural recording. The Mexican Spotted Owl is a subspecies of the Spotted Owl (Stix occidentalis lucida). It is considered a threatened species by both the U.S. and Mexican governments, and is considered threatened in Colorado, Utah, and the Navajo Nation, and a Species of Concern in Arizona and New Mexico. How did I get it? Well, by setting my microphone in the dry creek bed and letting it run all night long. At around 3am, when the insect chorus was quite subdued, the owl began hooting. I lay fast asleep in my tent and therefore missed the entire performance.

Nature Recording
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Aravaipa Deersnorts (Aravaipa Canyon Nightscape)
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

An engaging binaural soundscape featuring a White-tailed Deer snorting, stomping and bounding away in the dark of the night. Includes songs of a Yellow-breasted Chat and a backdrop of chirping and trilling crickets . Recorded 24 May 2017 in Turkey Creek, a dry tributary of Aravaipa Creek at the eastern boundary of Aravaipa Canyon Wilderness Area in Arizona. © Lang Elliott, musicofnature.com Please listen using headphones! The crickets are a bit overwhelming to my ear, but note that I've already done my best to reduce their loudness without compromising the sounds made by the deer.

Nature Recording
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Chat Nightsong #2 (Aravaipa Canyon Nightscape)
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

A Yellow-breasted Chat singing at night along Turkey Creek (dry at this season), a tributary of Aravaipa Creek in Aravaipa Canyon in southeastern Arizona. 16 May 2017. © Lang Elliott. Chats are common in many parts of Arizona. Males often sing at night and I'm always trying to capture a great example. This chat was recorded in a dry canyon and features a slow-paced night-song set against a pleasing chorus of crickets. It's a favorite in that the male's song seems a bit less raucous than many other chats I've recorded.

Nature Recording
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Chat Nightsong #1 (Aravaipa Canyon Nightscape)
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

A Yellow-breasted Chat singing at night along Aravaipa Creek in Aravaipa Canyon in southeastern Arizona. 29 April 2017. © Lang Elliott. Chats are common in many parts of Arizona. Males often sing at night and I'm always trying to capture a great example. I like this one a lot, with the chat's raucous night-song set against the gurgle of Aravaipa Creek. I wonder what listener's will think of this recording. It is somewhat minimalistic, in the sense that it involves only two sound objects, the chat and the stream. Nonetheless, it is pleasurable to me perhaps in part because I'm familiar with the chat and really appreciate its night-song, even though the chat is clearly not a melodic singer. For me, chat+stream, recorded binaurally, produces a compelling and enjoyable soundscape that (I think) captures the essence of the chat's unusual night-time performance.

Nature Recording
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Flycatcher Bend (Aravaipa Canyon Soundscape)
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

A binaural soundscape featuring Southwestern Willow Flycatchers. Recorded 15 May 2017 in Aravaipa Canyon, on Arizona Nature Conservancy property near the east boundary of the Aravaipa Canyon Wilderness area in southeastern Arizona. According to the Conservancy staff, this is the first documentation of the species on their property. The photo shows the habitat. At least two individuals were singing from a large stand of willows and other hardwoods near a patch of cattails along Aravaipa Creek. The Southwestern Willow Flycatcher, Empidonax traillii extimus, is a subspecies of the Willow Flycatcher and is currently listed as endangered by the US Fish and Wildlife Service. Here's what our federal government has to say about it: "Best known for its unique “fitz-bew” call, the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher depends on the riparian and wetland habitats in this arid region. The bird serves as an indicator of this unique landscape, where water is so crucial. It’s the lifeblood of the desert southwest with hundreds of species depending on it for survival. Lush vegetation surrounding rivers and streams in this region harbor hundreds of different wildlife species, rivaling the Amazon’s rainforests in biodiversity. Because of loss and fragmentation of habitat, largely caused by surface water diversion, groundwater pumping and the spread of invasive plants, the bird's numbers have plummeted. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) declared the species endangered in 1995. But stewardship-minded landowners from across the Southwest have stepped up and are helping the bird and many other wildlife species by voluntarily restoring and improving the health of the region’s riparian ecosystems." Above quote from: https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/detail/national/programs/financial/whip/?cid=stelprdb1047041

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Chat's Domain (Aravaipa Canyon Waterscape)
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

A binaural dawn chorus soundscape featuring a number of songbirds set against the gurgle of Aravaipa Creek. Particularly prominent are the songs of a Yellow Breasted Chat and a Northern Cardinal. The gobble of a Wild Turkey can be heard in the background. Recorded 30 April 2017 on Nature Conservancy property at the eastern edge of the Aravaipa Canyon Wilderness Area in southeastern Arizona. Please Listen Using Headphones!

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Dawn At Willow Narrows (Aravaipa Canyon Waterscape)
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

A binaural soundscape featuring the gentle tinkling of Aravaipa Creek on a calm stretch edged with willows. A Mourning Dove calls in the distance and the loud whistles of a Gray Hawk are evident a few minutes in. Recorded 15 May 2017 on Nature Conservancy property near the eastern edge of the Aravaipa Canyon Wilderness Area in southeastern Arizona. Please Listen Using Headphones!

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Dawn Chorus (Aravaipa Canyon Waterscape)
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

A binaural dawn chorus soundscape featuring the gurgles of two riffles along a bend in Aravaipa Creek. Recorded 17 May 2017 on Nature Conservancy property near the eastern edge of the Aravaipa Canyon Wilderness Area in southeastern Arizona.

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Gentle Crickets (Aravaipa Canyon Waterscape)
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

A lovely binaural night-scape featuring a cricket chorus set against the gentle tinkling of Aravaipa Creek (listen especially for the gentle pulsating chirps of a Snowy Tree Cricket). Recorded 30 April 2017 on Nature Conservancy property near the eastern edge of the Aravaipa Canyon Wilderness Area in southeastern Arizona. Please Listen Using Headphones!

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Night Owls (Aravaipa Canyon Waterscape)
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

A binaural night-scape featuring the distant hoots of Great Horned Owls set again the gentle tinkling of Aravaipa Creek. Distant Yellow-breasted Chats also periodically sound off. Recorded 2 May 2017 on Nature Conservancy property near the eastern edge of the Aravaipa Canyon Wilderness Area in southeastern Arizona. Please Listen Using Headphones!

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Night Yelper (Aravaipa Canyon Waterscape)
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

A binaural night-scape featuring the yelping calls of an Elf Owl set against the gentle rush and gurgles of Aravaipa Creek. Recorded 2 May 2017 on Nature Conservancy property near the eastern edge of the Aravaipa Canyon Wilderness Area in southeastern Arizona. Please Listen Using Headphones!

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Turkey Dawn (Aravaipa Canyon Waterscape)
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

A binaural soundscape featuring the repeated gobbles of a lone male turkey at dawn. This relaxing waterscape is one of my favorites from the canyon. Recorded 30 April 2017 on Nature Conservancy property near the eastern edge of the Aravaipa Canyon Wilderness Area in southeastern Arizona. Please Listen Using Headphones!

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Okanagon Thrushscape
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

A binaural soundscape featuring several Swainson's Thrushes singing in Subalpine Fir near Baldy Mountain to the east of Oliver in the Okanagon Valley of British Columbia. Recorded 7:20am, 28 June 2017. This beautiful soundscape also includes the rush of a mountain brook (left channel)and the gentle gurgling of a nearby freshet (right channel). Listen also for what I believe to be six nasal calls from a young mule deer (fawn), sounding off in the distance at 6:50 as it moved through the forest.

Nature
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Thunder Crickets
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

The arrival of a thunderstorm at the edge of a meadow in upstate New York. A light rain falls and thunder rumbles as the storm moves by. Two Snowy Tree Crickets call from nearby shrubs, their repeated trills given in almost perfect unison. How relaxing, but beware … this soundscape may put you right to sleep. Recorded binaurally at 11pm, 21 September, 2011. Connecticut Hill Wildlife Mangement Area near Ithaca, New York.

Nature
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Porcupine Panderings
Lang Elliott – Music of Nature

Porcupine squeals given in the middle of the night. 9/25/17 Shindagin Hollow near Brooktondale, New York. This is a 2.5-minute compilation of calls that occurred over an hour-long period. I have also included hoots from a Barred Owl. I have been told by an expert that the squeals are made by a female (in breeding condition) being pursued by a male. She squeals to rebuff the male, who is perhaps as bit too excited. Please visit my blog post for more information about this recording: https://musicofnature.com/porcupine-panderings/

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