Inquiring Minds tracks on Soundclound

#inquiringminds

Up To Date | Google Glass Lives! and Breaking Dog Urine News
Inquiring Minds

This week: A Standford study used Google Glass to help kids with autism understand others people’s emotions; and breaking news regarding the way dogs pee. Links: Google Glass helps kids with autism read facial expressions http://med.stanford.edu/news/all-news/2018/08/google-glass-helps-kids-with-autism-read-facial-expressions.html Small Dogs Aim High When They Pee https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/dog-spies/small-dogs-aim-high-when-they-pee/

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Up To Date | How Plants Tell Time, Lab-Grown Pig Lungs, Stolen Fields Medal
Inquiring Minds

This week: A new study from the University of Bristol showing the way plants accumulate sugar helps them tell what time it is; scientists have successfully transplanted lab-grown lungs into pigs; and Caucher Birkar was awarded the Fields Medal—and then it was immediately stolen. Links: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-08/uob-pct073118.php https://www.sciencenews.org/article/scientists-transplant-lab-grown-bioengineered-lungs-pigs https://www.npr.org/2018/08/02/634889308/prestigious-mathematics-medal-stolen-minutes-after-it-was-awarded

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The Surprising, Secret Life of Beavers
Inquiring Minds

Ben Goldfarb is a writer covering wildlife conservation and fisheries management. We talk to him about his new book Eager: The Surprising, Secret Life of Beavers and Why They Matter.

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Up To Date | A Lake on Mars, Dog Empathy, and TBI & the Military
Inquiring Minds

This week: Italian scientists found a body of liquid water on mars using radar; a new study suggests that while dogs do feel empathy for us, training them to be therapy dogs doesn’t make them care more, it makes them more obedient; and research shows that military training can result in traumatic brain injuries even outside of combat. Links: http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/07/liquid-water-spied-deep-below-polar-ice-cap-mars https://hub.jhu.edu/2018/07/24/dogs-comfort-owners-canine-psychology/ https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/07/25/632243103/marines-who-fired-rocket-launchers-now-worry-about-their-brains

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Revisiting Flint: A Story of Crisis, Resistance, and Hope
Inquiring Minds

We talk to Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, the pediatrician who first proved that Flint’s kids were exposed to lead about her new book What the Eyes Don't See: A Story of Crisis, Resistance, and Hope in an American City. Links: https://inquiring.show/episodes/2018/4/1/171-siddhartha-roy-the-science-behind-the-flint-water-crisis

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Up To Date | GMO Acceptance, Elle Macpherson, and Friendly Fish
Inquiring Minds

This week: New research suggests labeling can increase GMO acceptance; Elle Macpherson’s terrible new boyfriend (it’s relevant, I swear); and research looking into the personality of caught fish. Links mentioned: Mandatory labels can improve attitudes toward genetically engineered food http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/4/6/eaaq1413.full Friendlier fish may be quicker to take the bait https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/07/180716114546.htm

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How Neuroscience Is Redefining Athletic Genius
Inquiring Minds

We talk to sports and business journalist Zach Schonbrun about his new book The Performance Cortex: How Neuroscience Is Redefining Athletic Genius.

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Up To Date - Killing Cancer Cells and Exploring the Sunk Cost Fallacy (In Rats)
Inquiring Minds

This week: New research into using CRISPR to destroy cancer cells with other cancer cells and a study suggesting rodents aren’t immune to the sunk cost fallacy. Links: Cancer cells engineered with CRISPR slay their own kin https://www.sciencenews.org/article/cancer-cells-engineered-crispr-slay-their-own-kin Sensitivity to “sunk costs” in mice, rats, and humans http://science.sciencemag.org/content/361/6398/178

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Nikola Tesla: Inventor of the Modern
Inquiring Minds

We talk to author Richard Munson about his new Nikola Tesla biography Tesla: Inventor of the Modern.

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Up To Date | Air Pollution & Diabetes, Microbiome Studies, & Why Driving Makes You Sleepy
Inquiring Minds

This week: New research exploring the link between air pollution and diabetes; the huge potential of doing large scale microbiome studies; and a look into why driving makes babies (and the rest of us) sleepy. Links mentioned: https://www.npr.org/2018/07/05/594078923/scott-pruitt-out-at-epa https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-pollution-diabetes/air-pollution-may-account-for-1-in-7-new-diabetes-cases-idUSKBN1JV25W https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-05522-1 https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00140139.2018.1482373

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Aroused: The History of Hormones
Inquiring Minds

We talk to Randi Hutter Epstein, M.D, lecturer at Yale university, writer in residence at Yale Medical School, and author of the new book Aroused: The History of Hormones and How They Control Just About Everything.

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Up To Date | Longevity Pioneers, Leaky Methane, and Predicting Earthquakes
Inquiring Minds

This week: New research shows mortality rates level off if you can reach a certain age; the problem of methane gas leaking from power plants; and a new likely candidate for where California’s next big earthquake will take place. Links mentioned: http://science.sciencemag.org/content/360/6396/1459 https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/06/180619164153.htm http://science.sciencemag.org/content/early/2018/06/20/science.aar7204

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Motherhood in the Animal Kingdom
Inquiring Minds

We talk to biologist and science writer Carin Bondar about her latest book Wild Moms: Motherhood in the Animal Kingdom.

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Up To Date | Mind Controlling Robots, Viral Alzheimer's Link, and Remembering Koko
Inquiring Minds

This week: New research into controlling robot arms with your brain, a surprising link between a common virus and Alzheimer's Disease, and remembering Koko the gorilla.

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Intelligent Machines Are Changing Everything
Inquiring Minds

How do we create artificial intelligence that isn't bigoted? Can we teach machines to work exactly like our brains work? “You don’t program a machine to be smart,” says our guest this week, “you program the machine to get smarter using data.” We talk to James Scott, statistician, data scientist, and co-author (with Nick Polson) of the new book AIQ: How People and Machines Are Smarter Together.

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Virtual Reality Is Changing Human Connection
Inquiring Minds

We talk to Peter Rubin, editor at Wired and author of Future Presence: How Virtual Reality Is Changing Human Connection, Intimacy, and the Limits of Ordinary Life.

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The Powers, Perversions, and Potential of Heredity
Inquiring Minds

We talk to Carl Zimmer, New York Times columnist and author of 13 books about science about his latest book She Has Her Mother's Laugh: The Powers, Perversions, and Potential of Heredity.

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Up To Date | Don’t Eat Clay, Do Eat Dark Chocolate
Inquiring Minds

This week: New research shows a 6-month treatment for breast cancer is nearly as successful as the previously-standard 12-month course; the surprising effects that clay can have on your body; and a look into new studies that give new reasons why dark chocolate is good for you. Huge thanks to guest co-host Adam Bristol! Links mentioned: https://www.jwatch.org/fw114187/2018/05/18/herceptin-study-suggests-shorter-6-month-course-breast https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-26958-5

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Up To Date | Where Happiness Comes From, and Why
Inquiring Minds

In this mini-episode, Kishore talks to neuroscientist and author Dean Burnett about his new book Happy Brain: Where Happiness Comes From, and Why.

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Why We're Addicted to Screens
Inquiring Minds

We talk to Adam Alter, author and marketing and psychology professor at NYU's Stern School of Business about his book Irresistible: The Rise of Addictive Technology and the Business of Keeping Us Hooked.

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