BMJ talk medicine tracks on Soundclound

#bmjpodcasts

When an investigative journalist calls
BMJ talk medicine

At Evidence Live this year, the focus of the conference was on communication of evidence - both academically, and to the public. And part of that is the role that investigative journalism has to play in that. At the BMJ we’ve used investigative journalistic techniques to try and expose wrong doing on the part of government and industry - always in collaboration with clinicians and researchers. To explain a bit more about the world of journalism and campaigning, we're joined by to Shelley Jofre - from the BBC, Jet Schouten - from Radar, Kath Sansom - who started the online sling the mesh campaign & Deb Cohen, former investigations editor at The BMJ.

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Need a big fat surprise? Iconoclast Nina Teicholz via Dr Mark Hyman on healthy fats. #Ep338
BMJ talk medicine

BJSM is one of very few channels that comments on food but doesn’t receive any funds from any food-related stakeholder. The BMJ doesn’t receive funds from food companies (as far as I know) and the new BMJ Open journal on nutrition doesn’t either. What about the ‘British Nutrition Foundation’ – sounds pretty helpful right? Well, it may be, but if you know where to click 5 times you can find that about 1/3 of its funding from corporate sponsors. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics has food sponsors too. That’s perfectly legal. What about Government Food Guidelines – surely they are based on health evidence? Well, they may be, but governments run the food guidelines past their Departments of Agriculture before finalizing them. And that is OK too – I can understand why that would happen – of course that Department has to have input. Government requires balancing competing interests. I don’t recommend people following national food guidelines (personal opinion – k2). I wouldn’t follow most nations’ food guidelines if I were given the food for free and paid $100 per day. Not for $500 per day – sorry. I’m fortunate as I’m on stable financial footing (touch wood). And what I eat may be ‘wrong’. This podcast is shared with the BJSM community in a spirit of humility and to provide data for folks to make up their own minds. Nina Teicholz is a journalist (let’s get than in early to save the critics from bringing it up – pre-empting the ad hominem attack) and she has a fascinating book that argues fats have been unfairly demonized. Since that book was published the news that Harvard scientists were paid for a report suggesting that fats, not sugar, caused obesity. http://ow.ly/j1Bc30kCvqx. Nina Teicholz tweets from @bigfatsurprise. Thanks to Dr Mark Hyman (@MarkHymanMD) for allowing us to edit his conversation with Nina Teicholz. Link to a recent Nina Teicholz comment in The BMJ: https://www.bmj.com/content/360/bmj.k822/rr-13 Here’s a link to the book that documents the case for healthy fats: https://thebigfatsurprise.com/ The original (full version) of Dr Mark Hyman’s podcast with Nina Teicholz on YouTube https://youtu.be/Zc_e5ME_5Cg Thanks again to Dr Mark Hyman and Nina Teicholz.

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A clinical guide to ricin poisoning, with Prof Susan Smolinske
BMJ talk medicine

Susan Smolinske, Director of the New Mexico Drug and Poison Information Centre, and Professor of Pharmacy Practice and Administrative Sciences, University of New Mexico, gives us a clinical guide to ricin poisoning. To learn more about ricin poisoning, visit BMJ Best Practice. bestpractice.bmj.com/topics/en-gb/1051 _ The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. The content of this podcast does not constitute medical advice and it is not intended to function as a substitute for a healthcare practitioner’s judgement, patient care or treatment. The views expressed by contributors are those of the speakers. BMJ does not endorse any views or recommendations discussed or expressed on this podcast. Listeners should also be aware that professionals in the field may have different opinions. By listening to this podcast, listeners agree not to use its content as the basis for their own medical treatment or for the medical treatment of others.

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Atoms: the ADC July 2018 issue in five minutes!
BMJ talk medicine

Editor-in-Chief of ADC Nick Brown brings you the monthly Atoms - the highlights of the July 2018 issue in a very short podcast. Read the highlights on the Archives of Disease in Childhood website: adc.bmj.com/content/103/7/i.

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What’s new in treating hip pain – FAI syndrome? Physio first or arthroscopy? Episode #337
BMJ talk medicine

Damian Griffin is the Professor of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Warwick. He trained in Cambridge, Oxford and the United States, and worked as a Consultant in Oxford before taking up the Foundation Chair in Warwick and helping to establish Warwick Medical School. Here’s a link to his personal website: http://www.hiparthroscopyclinic.co.uk/ He was the chief investigator for the FASHioN trial, a large, multicenter randomised controlled trial of treatments for people with FAI syndrome, comparing surgery with physiotherapy-led rehabilitation:www.nets.nihr.ac.uk/projects/hta/1310302. He has published a major paper in the field of hip pain in one of the top sports medicine journals – The Lancet. Published @TheLancet on June 2nd. http://ow.ly/4LhQ30kvJ1u BJSM fortunate to have chatted with @DamianGriffin courtesy of @footballmed. Podcast about it with the BJSM community in two weeks - 15th June (all 2018). Previous podcast with Damian Griffin: About the FAI syndrome: http://ow.ly/oo7530kvJB5. Two years ago. Griffin DR, Dickenson EJ, O'Donnell J, et al. The Warwick Agreement on femoroacetabular impingement syndrome (FAI syndrome): an international consensus statement. Br J Sports Med2016;50:1169-1176. http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/50/19/1169 You can follow Damian on Twitter @DamianGriffin and @WarwickOrtho or reach him on [email protected]

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Don Berwick - you can break the rules to help patients
BMJ talk medicine

Don Berwick, president emeritus of the Institute of Healthcare Improvement, and former Administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. In this conversation he discusses how he went from being a paediatrician to running Medicare for Obama, how we can create headroom in stressed systems, and breaking the rules to make things better for patients and staff. Quality improvement series:

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Darknet Opioids
BMJ talk medicine

When tackling societal problems - like the opioid epidemic in the US - there are two ways of approaching it. One is to reduce demand - by organising treatment programmes, or reducing the underlying reasons why people may become addicted in the first place - but that’s hard. So governments often turn to the other route - reducing supply - and that’s what the US government did in 2014 when it rescheduled oxycodone combination products from schedule 3 to schedual 2 - essentially making it harder for people to obtain a prescription. Now reducing that legal supply, without in hand reducing the demand, led to fears that those people with an opioid addiction would just turn to illicit routes to obtain their drugs - and new research published on bmj.com has attempted to find out if that happened. We're joined by 3 of the authors, James Martin, associate professor of criminology at Swinburne University; Judith Aldridge, professor of criminology at the University of Manchester; and Jack Cunliffe, lecturer in quantitative methods and criminology at the University of Kent. Read the full research: https://www.bmj.com/content/361/bmj.k2480

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Don’t neglect nutrition in rheumatoid arthritis!
BMJ talk medicine

What mistakes should be avoided in our diet? And what potentially beneficial foods should we be taking? The answers are given by Professor Maurizio Cutolo (Postgraduate School of Rheumatology, University of Genova, Genova, Italy)in this short conversation with Claire Daien (Rheumatology department, Montpellier University, France) recorded at the XVII Mediterranean Congress of Rheumatology, in Genova, Italy, in April 2018. Read the full editorial on the RMD Open website: http://rmdopen.bmj.com/content/4/1/e000591.

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Women in cardiology - breaking down the barriers
BMJ talk medicine

In this episode of the Heart podcast, Digital Media Editor DrJames Rudd is joined by Dr Cara Hendry from Manchester and Dr Iain Simpson from Southampton. They are passionate about reducing barriers that exist in cardiology and other medical specialities. They discuss what the issues are and what is being done to help in the UK and beyond. If you enjoy the show, please leave us a podcast review at https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/heart-podcast/id445358212?mt=2

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Transgender children and adolescents: practical and evidence-based approach for paediatricians
BMJ talk medicine

Considering the large increase in the number of children and adolescents who question conventional gender expectations and seek to develop a body that is congruent with their gender feelings, how can paediatricians best respond? Dysphoria v. dysmorphia; or diagnosis v. recognition are some of the concepts and distinctions you’ll hear about in this podcast, which is an absorbing conversation between the ADC’s Editor-in-Chief Nick Brown and Gary Butler, Professor at the University College London Hospital NHS Trust, UK. For more information about the topics included in this podcast, read the review on the ADC website, which will also be included in the journal’s July 2018 issue: “Assessment and support of children and adolescents with gender dysphoria” - http://adc.bmj.com/content/early/2018/04/26/archdischild-2018-314992.

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Ashish Jha tries to see the world as it is.
BMJ talk medicine

There’s a lot going on in the world at the moment - Ebola’s back, Puerto Rico is without power and the official estimations of death following the hurricane are being challenged. The WHO’s just met to decide what to do about it all, as well as sorting out universal healthcare, access to medicines, eradicating polio, etc etc. To make sense of that a little, we grabbed Ashish Jha - Director of the Harvard Global Health Institute to shed some light into how decisions about global health are made, and why he tries to see the world as it actually is - not how he wishes it would be. Reading list: Mortality in Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMsa1803972 https://www.bmj.com/universal-health-coverage

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Nutritional science - why studying what we eat is so difficult.
BMJ talk medicine

We at The BMJ care about food, and if our listener stats are to be believed, so do you. In this podcast we talk to a few of the authors of a new series, published next week on bmj.com, which tries to provide some insight into the current state of nutritional science - where the controversies lie, where there’s broad agreement, and the journey of our understanding of nutrition. The open access fees for those articles has been paid for by Swiss Re - a wholesale provider of reinsurance, insurance and other insurance-based forms of risk transfer - they have not had any input into the editorial process, which has gone through the same peer review as any of our other analysis articles. Swiss Re are also co-hosting a conference where we’ll be bringing together a lot of these researchers - and which will be live streamed next week - you’ll be able to access that for free on bmj.com For more on the conference: http://institute.swissre.com/events/food_for_thought_bmj.html

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Anthem for football fitness. Football isn’t just fun, it’s broad-spectrum medicine. Ep #336
BMJ talk medicine

Dr Marcos Agostinho (@MarcMedMD) asks Professor Peter Krustrup (http://ow.ly/9slg30koLv1) about the history of football fitness. What is it? Does it involve games/competition? Who are the main beneficiaries? And what of ‘walking football’ – what does that entail? This short podcast is a celebration of the health benefits of football and it provides powerful practical examples of what can be done. Kudos! The 2nd International Football and Medicine Conference will be held in Odense, Denmark, on 25-26th January 2019. Here is a 2018 systematic review: Broad-spectrum physical fitness benefits of recreational football: a systematic review and meta-analysis. http://ow.ly/oGBs30koLzT

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Questions asked in everyday practice: Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors
BMJ talk medicine

Immunotherapy has been approved for several indications in Oncology, resulting in an increasing number of physicians that use it to treat their patients. In this podcast, Teresa Amaral, member of the ESMO YOC, interviews Professor John Haanen (Head of the Division of Medical Oncology and Staff Scientist in the Division of Immunology; Professor of Translational Immunotherapy of Cancer at Leiden University Medical Centre, the Netherlands) on the topic: “Questions asked in everyday practice: Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors”. Currently, there is no consensus about how long should we treat patients with immunotherapy and the optimal duration might also be different considering the tumor type (e.g. melanoma, NSCLC). In some patients, stopping early due to adverse events doesn’t seem to be detrimental, but the follow-up time is still short to make definitive assumptions. When treating a patient with a previous autoimmune disease, several aspects need to be considered, namely, which type of immunosuppression is the patient receiving now, in which dosage and how long has the autoimmune disease been stable. Patients that received a solid organ transplant pose an extra challenge. For patients that develop grade 4 autoimmune adverse events, re-treatment with immunotherapy should be extensively discussed. In case of severe autoimmune toxicity that does not respond to the treatments referred in the guidelines, and if the treating physician is not experienced with escalating immunosuppressive therapy, consultation with other centers with more familiarity and expertise on this topic should be considered.

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Specialised education needed for nurses in stroke rehabilitation units
BMJ talk medicine

In this episode, Helen Noble, associate editor at EBN, talks to Linda Campbell, the stroke coordinator at NHS Highland in Scotland. They are discussing the need for nurse education to address uncertainties of role and contribution in stroke rehabilitation. Read the commentary on the EBN website: http://ebn.bmj.com/content/21/2/44. Commentary on: Loft MI, Poulsen I, Esbensen BA, et al. Nurses’ and nurse assistants’ beliefs, attitudes and actions related to role and function in an inpatient stroke rehabilitation unit: a qualitative study. J Clin Nurs 2017;26:4905–14.

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Epilepsy an evidence update
BMJ talk medicine

Is the mesial temporal lobe the seat of psychosis in epilepsy? James Allebone (University of Melbourne, Australia) discusses what neuroimaging can tell us about psychosis in epilepsy. Read the paper here: http://jnnp.bmj.com/content/89/6/611. Patients with epilepsy are often not permitted to drive, but can this change after surgery? Professor John Duncan (University College London, UK) provides a crucial update on measuring relative risk of seizures following epilepsy surgery, and how this impacts on UK driving regulations. Read the paper here: http://jnnp.bmj.com/content/89/6/599

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The motives behind dual use of electronic and smoked cigarettes
BMJ talk medicine

Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) arguably pose fewer health risks than smoking, yet many smokers adopt them without fully relinquishing smoking. In this podcast, Tobacco Control Assisytant Editor Becky Freeman talks with Lindsay Robertson (Cancer Society Social and Behavioural Research Unit, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand) about the reasons behind ‘dual use’ and its public health implications. Read the full paper on the Tobacco Control website: http://tobaccocontrol.bmj.com/content/early/2018/01/31/tobaccocontrol-2017-054070.

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