BMJ talk medicine tracks on Soundclound

#bmjpodcasts

Don't save on transport at the cost of the NHS
BMJ talk medicine

Last week we heard about how evidence in policy making is imperilled - but today we’re hearing about a plan to make evidence about health central to all aspects of government. Laura Webber, director of public health modelling at the UK Health Forum, Susie Morrow, chair of the Wandsworth Living Streets Group and Brian Ferguson, chief economist at Public Health England join us to discuss a “health in all policies” approach, with protected funding for preventive interventions. Read their full analysis: https://www.bmj.com/content/362/bmj.k3377

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Talking physical activity and Golf and health, with Dr Andrew Murray. Episode #349
BMJ talk medicine

We were thrilled to catch up again with Dr Andrew Murray, the recently appointed Chief Medical Officer to the PGA European Tour, European Tour Performance Institute, and Ryder Cup Europe. He is universally known for his work promoting physical activity for health, his ultra-endurance challenges, and for leading the ‘Golf and Health project’. In this podcast he covers everything from the health benefits of golf, how to produce a consensus statement, the WHO’s GAPPA, to how to overcome various factors affecting knowledge translation #Gold Various papers/resources are referred to throughout the podcast, links to which can be found below: http://bjsm.bmj.com/lookup/doi/10.1136/bjsports-2018-099509 http://bjsm.bmj.com/lookup/doi/10.1136/bjsports-2018-099771 The relationships between golf and health: a scoping review https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/51/1/12 Previous BJSM podcast on Golf & Health: https://soundcloud.com/bmjpodcasts/andrew-murray-1 The World Health Organization’s Global Action Plan for Physical Activity: Prof Fiona Bull https://soundcloud.com/bmjpodcasts/the-world-health-organizations-global- action-plan-for-physical-activity-prof-fiona-bull?in=bmjpodcasts/sets/bjsm-1 It is time to replace publish or perish with get visible or vanish: opportunities where digital and social media can reshape knowledge translation https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2017/11/17/bjsports-2017-098367 We hope you enjoyed the podcast – get in touch with us via social media if you have any questions for @docandrewmurray

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The use of MRI in rheumatology
BMJ talk medicine

RMD Open Editor-in-Chief Professor Bernard Combe talks to Professor Annette van der Helm from Leiden University Medical Center about the use of MR imaging in the diagnosis and classification of rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases. Professor van der Helm briefly summarises the pros and cons of MR imaging in comparison with the use of CT images, and highlights some of the technical challenges of this technique. For further information on this topic please read this viewpoint article published in RMD Open: https://rmdopen.bmj.com/content/4/1/e000728.

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Atoms: the ADC October 2018 issue in a very short podcast!
BMJ talk medicine

Editor-in-Chief of ADC Nick Brown brings you the monthly Atoms - the highlights of the October 2018 issue. Read the highlights on the Archives of Disease in Childhood website: adc.bmj.com/content/103/10/i.

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The Metastatic Breast Cancer project: a novel patient-partnered initiative
BMJ talk medicine

In this podcast, Marina Parry, ESMO Open Digital Editor, speaks to Elana Anastasio, Partnership Outreach Manager, and Brett Tomson, Scientific Outreach Manager, both from the Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC) Project team at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. The MBCproject is a novel model of a patient-partnered initiative whose aim is to accelerate the understanding of metastatic breast cancer by generating a massive open database of deidentified genomic information from patients’ tumour samples, alongside abstracted clinical information, and patient-reported data. Although research has increased the understanding of MBC, no cure exists, and more work needs to be done. As 85% of US cancer patients are treated in community settings where tumour samples are not often included in academic research projects, much of the diversity of this disease and other cancers has not yet been captured. However, by engaging patients directly regardless of where they live, the MBCproject is in a unique position to be able to help generate a dataset to further decipher the complex biology behind disease progression, and answer important research questions, such as why some therapies work in certain patients while others do not. The data generated by the MBCproject has already been, and will continue to be, widely and openly shared with the global community. Started in October 2015 by Nikhil Wagle (Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Medical Oncologist at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Associate Member of the Broad Institute) and Corrie Painter (Associate Director of Operations and Scientific Outreach in the Cancer Program of the Broad Institute), the MBCproject has had over 4,620 participants register at the time of recording (June 2018). In the podcast, we discuss the challenges faced by the team, the enthusiasm they were met with from patients, the logistical and operational hurdles they have overcome, the importance of finding a common language and building trust between participants and researchers, the role of social media and patient advocates, as well as the other patient-partnered projects this team has since initiated, including in angiosarcoma (launched March 2017, >200 patients registered as of June 2018) and metastatic prostate cancer (launched January 2018, 450 patients registered as of June 2018), with a gastro-esophageal cancer project starting in the coming months. The MBCproject continues to grow, and a first batch of data has already been released, which organisers hope, and want, to be used by researchers worldwide. New directions for this project are discussed, as well as additional follow up surveys that will be used to glean even more information from patient participants, thus building an incredibly rich database for use by the research community. The MBCproject is an exceptional example of a scientifically focused project that is also a testament to human empowerment, and which demonstrates a changed landscape of research where many people want to take an active role in the understanding of their disease, as well as being involved themselves in further accelerating scientific discoveries. Finally, the MBCproject organisers want to hear back from scientists and researchers about ideas or questions they have on how to use the existing data or new data you think would be good to try and generate. They encourage listeners to get in touch! Their website is https://www.mbcproject.org.

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Defending evidence informed policy making from ideological attack
BMJ talk medicine

If you’re of a scientific persuasion, watching policy debates around Brexit, or climate change, or drug prohibition are likely to cause feelings of intense frustration about the dearth of evidence in those discussions. In this podcast we're joined by Chris Bonell, professor of public health sociology - in this podcast he airs those frustrations, and worries that the rise of populism is pushing evidence even further out of policy decision. Read the accompanying essay: https://www.bmj.com/content/362/bmj.k3827

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Low carb vs low fat diet for type 2 diabetes. Episode #348
BMJ talk medicine

Contrary to the long held contention that low fat diets are best for people with type 2 diabetes (DM2), the totality of current evidence suggests that low carb diets are at least as effective in ameliorating metabolic health in DM2. In fact, low carb seems to be somewhat better, particularly in the short to medium term, although the evidence is of moderate certainty.   On this week’s episode Prof Hanno Pijl (@HannoPijl) and dr Esther van Zuuren (@Ezzoef) join Dr Aseem Malhotra (@DrAseemMalhotra) to discuss the most appropriate diet for people with DM2   Hanno Pijl is an internist-endocrinologist and professor of Diabetology at the Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC) In Leiden, The Netherlands. He co-authored over 250 papers in peer reviewed scientific journals, primarily related to obesity and type 2 diabetes. He has been a member of the Dutch Health Council (standing committee on nutrition) from 2008-2016. He currently co-chairs the Dutch Innovation center for Lifestyle Medicine (www.nilg.eu), a joint effort of LUMC and the Dutch Organisation of Applied Science (TNO) focusing on lifestyle interventions in health care.   Esther van Zuuren is a dermatologist at the Leiden University Medical Centre, but apart from that and more relevant for now is that her expertise lies in Evidence Based Medicine. She has been with Cochrane for almost 20 years, has held the position of Key Editor and Methods editor for Cochrane Skin group for several years and conducted over 30 systematic reviews on a wide variety of topics. Furthermore, she is member of the GRADE working group, is a Recommendations Editor for DynaMed Plus (clinical evidence-based reference tool for clinicians) and Associate Editor for Systematic Reviews for the British Journal of Dermatology   In our 20 min conversation we discuss   Efficacy of low fat versus low carb diets in the treatment of type 2 diabetes The method of weighing the certainty of evidence we used in our systematic review of the literature Dietary recommendations for people with type 2 diabetes https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-abstract/108/2/300/5051863

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How often do hospital doctors change long term medication during an inpatient stay?
BMJ talk medicine

More than ½ of patients leave hospital with changes to four or more of their long-term medications - but how appropriate are those changes? New research published on bmj.com looks at antihypertensive medication prescription changes to try and model that - and found that more than half of intensifications occurred in patients with previously well controlled outpatient blood pressure. To discuss what they found, we're joined by Timothy Anderson, primary care research fellow, and Michael Steinman, professor of medicine, both from UCSF. Read the open access research: https://www.bmj.com/content/362/bmj.k3503

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Diet and exercise for life with Dr Hazel Wallace - Part 1
BMJ talk medicine

In this episode of the Heart podcast, Digital Media Editor, Dr James Rudd, is joined by Dr Hazel Wallace, a.k.a the food medic, from London. Hazel is a medical doctor, a bestselling author, a qualified personal trainer and regularly lectures to healthcare professionals about diet and exercise medicine. They discuss the latest thinking in diet and exercise and how to improve teaching for doctors on these subjects. This is a very fun episode! Watch out for part 2 in two weeks. If you enjoy the show, please subscribe to the podcast to get episodes automatically downloaded to your phone and computer. Also, please consider leaving us a review at https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/heart-podcast/id445358212?mt=2 Links: https://thefoodmedic.co.uk/

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Here's your New DTB!
BMJ talk medicine

In September's podcast, James Cave (DTB Editor-in-Chief) and David Phizackerley (DTB Deputy Editor) highlight some of the changes to DTB that have taken place this month and discuss the background and rationale to these changes. Read this month's editorial: https://dtb.bmj.com/content/56/9/98. The editors also consider the place for monitored dosage systems (https://dtb.bmj.com/content/56/9/102) and discuss the evidence for using labetalol as a first-line treatment option for hypertension in pregnancy (https://dtb.bmj.com/content/56/9/107). Meet the new DTB here: https://dtb.bmj.com/content/56/9.

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Might children rust? What are the risks of supplemental oxygen in acute illness
BMJ talk medicine

In this episode, ADC’s Editor-in-Chief Nick Brown talks to Mark Peters, Professor of Paediatric Intensive Care at Great Ormond Street Hospital. They discuss the recent editorial published in ADC regarding the risks of supplemental oxygen in acute illness. http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/archdischild-2018-315437

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How can discrimination towards lesbian, gay and bisexual parents be avoided?
BMJ talk medicine

Professor Linda Shields, credentialed children’s and young people’s nurse from the Faculty of Science, Charles Sturt University, New South Wales, Australia, talks us through the details of the findings of her research on discriminatory nursing practice towards lesbian, gay and bisexual parents. She is the co-author of a commentary published by Evidence-Based Nursing on: Andersen AE, Moberg C, Bengtsson Tops A, et al. Lesbian, gay and bisexual parents' experiences of nurses' attitudes in child health care: a qualitative study. J Clin Nurs. 2017; 26:5065-5071. Listen to the full conversation with EBN's Editor-in-Chief Professor Alison Twycross and read the commentary: https://ebn.bmj.com/content/21/2/47.

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Nutritional science - Is quality more important than quantity?
BMJ talk medicine

We at The BMJ care about food, and if our listener stats are to be believed, so do you. In this podcast we’re looking at quality as an important driver of a good diet. At our recent food conference - Food For Thought - hosted in Zurich by Swiss Re we brought researchers in many fields of nutritional science together. We asked people with competing ideas to write articles to elucidate where there’s agreement, and where there is still contention. There was lots of disagreement - but one thing that was widely agreed on was that, quality of food matters. Quality is as, if not more, important than quantity. In this podcast we’ll be exploring what quality is, how industrial food production affects it, and how we conceptualise quality. Joining us are Martin White, Mathilde Touvier, Jean Adams, Nicola Guess and Alan Levinovitz. For the last podcast in the food series: https://soundcloud.com/bmjpodcasts/nutritional-science-why-studying-what-we-eat-is-so-difficult? For more on the Food for Thought series https://www.bmj.com/food-for-thought

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Time to get real about childhood obesity with Dr Sandro Demaio. Episode #347
BMJ talk medicine

Did you know that the worldwide prevalence of obesity nearly tripled between 1975 and 2016? In 2016, more than 1.9 billion adults and more than 340 million children were classified as overweight or obese. At the individual level and in our modern, obesogenic world, weight gain has become the norm—the biological and social path of least resistance. On this week’s podcast, Dr Sandro Demaio (@SandroDemaio) joins BJSM’s Daniel Friedman (@ddfriedman) to discuss childhood obesity and public health nutrition policy. After recently leaving his role as the WHO’s medical officer for NCDs and Nutrition, Sandro was appointed the CEO of EAT , a non-profit startup focused on food and sustainability. Formerly an Assistant Professor and Course Director at the University of Copenhagen’s School of Global Health, and a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard, Sandro regularly shares his knowledge and ideas at international conferences, universities and public events. He founded the PLOS Global Health Blog, NCDFREE and festival21, and is currently a bestselling author and TV host. http://sandrodemaio.com/about In this conversation, Sandro addresses the following topics:        Our current state of obesity        Policies needed to address childhood obesity        Sugar-sweetened disease and the sugar tax        Role of the clinician in addressing the obesity pandemic   Further reading: Renzella, Jessica A., and Alessandro R. Demaio. "It’s time we paved a healthier path of least resistance." (2018): bjsports-2017. https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2018/03/07/bjsports-2017-098805 Murphy, Lisa, and Alessandro R. Demaio. "Understanding and removing barriers to physical activity: one key in addressing child obesity." (2018): bjsports-2017. https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2018/01/18/bjsports-2017-098546 Demaio, Alessandro. "A lifeSPANS approach: Addressing child obesity in Australia." Health Promotion Journal of Australia (2018). https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/hpja.44 Demaio, Alessandro, and Alexandra Jones. "The true price of sugar-sweetened disease: political inertia requires renewed, strategic action." The Medical Journal of Australia 209.2 (2018): 1. https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2018/209/2/true-price-sugar-sweetened-disease-political-inertia-requires-renewed-strategic Beale, Anna L., and Alessandro R. Demaio. "Non-communicable disease risk factors: a call for primary care clinicians to act and to refer. Brief intervention, not silent abdication." (2017): bjsports-2017. https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2017/10/05/bjsports-2017-098475

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Outcomes of oxygen saturation targeting during delivery room stabilisation of preterm infants
BMJ talk medicine

Discussion of paper "Outcomes of oxygen saturation targeting during delivery room stabilisation of preterm infants", included on the ADC Fetal and Neonatal issue of September 2018. https://fn.bmj.com/content/103/5/F446

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Criminal liability for the tobacco industry and its executives
BMJ talk medicine

In this episode, Becky Freeman talks to Kelsey Romeo-Stuppy of ASH > Action on Smoking and Health about the tobacco industry and the possibility of pursuing charges of criminal liability. To read more: Criminal Liability for the Tobacco Industry and its Executives (link to file: https://ash.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/ASH-Criminal-Liability.pdf)

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Immune checkpoint inhibitors for every non-small cell lung cancer patient
BMJ talk medicine

Several phase III trials on immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy in non-small cell lung cancer were recently published and changed the clinical practice Here, non-small cell lung cancer has to be categorized first according to the presence of activating mutations and second according to the programmed cell death ligand 1 (PDL1) expression. Approximately 25% of patients present with a driver mutation and should be treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors as the first line treatment strategy for metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. Approximately 75% of patients do not present with a driver mutation and should be treated according to the presence of PDL1 expression. Patients with high PDL1 (≥ 50% of tumor cells) expression are candidates for immune checkpoint inhibitor monotherapy, although a combination with chemotherapy can be suggested in patients with high tumor load and fast progressing disease. Patients with intermediate (1-49% of tumor cells) PDL1 expression are on the other hand candidates for the combination of chemotherapy with immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy according to the recently published data. Further, combination of immune checkpoint inhibitor-based therapy with chemotherapy and bevacizumab could be an option in patients with a driver mutation after the failure of available tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Listen to the podcast with Professor Johan Vansteenkiste, MD (Respiratory Oncology Unit and Trial Unit; Department of Respiratory Diseases University Hospitals KU Leuven; Catholic University Leuven, Belgium) and read the full Abstract on the ESMO Open website.

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Nusinersen for SMA
BMJ talk medicine

Elizabeth Highton (JNNP Podcast Editor) speaks with Dr. Michelle Farrar (University of New South Wales) discussing nusinersen, the first disease-modifying therapy for spinal muscular atrophy type 1 (SMA). https://jnnp.bmj.com/content/89/9/937

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Preventing Overdiagnosis 2018 - part 2: What opened your eyes to overdiagnosis?
BMJ talk medicine

The concept of overdiagnosis is pretty hard to get - especially if you’ve been educated in a paradigm where medicine has the answers, and it’s only every a positive intervention in someone’s life - the journey to understanding the flip side - that sometimes medicine can harm often takes what Stacey Carter director of Research for Social Change at Wollongong university described in an preventing overdiagnosis podcast last year as a “moral shock” - https://soundcloud.com/bmjpodcasts/preventing-overdiagnosis-2017-stacy-carter-on-the-culture-of-overmedicalisation This year, we asked some of the leaders in the field to describe what it was that opened their eyes to overdiagnosis and overtreatment - and recorded the session for you. You’ll hear from Fiona Godlee, editor in Chief of The BMJ, Steve Woloshin and Lisa Schwartz, directors of the Center for Medicine and Media at The Dartmouth Institute, John Brodersen - professor of general practice at the University of Copenhagen, and Barry Kramer - director of the Division of Cancer Prevention at the U.S. National cancer institute. The

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