BMJ talk medicine tracks on Soundclound

#bmjpodcasts

Cardiac CT, NICE and chest pain - can we meet the demand for imaging?
BMJ talk medicine

In this episode of the Heart podcast, Digital Media Editor Dr. James Rudd is joined by cardiologist and cardiac CT expert Dr. Ed Nicol from The Royal Brompton Hospital, London. They discuss what the updated NICE guidelines for the assessment of stable chest pain mean for the UK imaging community. They also cover the differences between the UK, European and US guidelines and how technological developments in CT might help patients and save money. Please leave us a podcast review at itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/heart…id445358212?mt=2 Link to published papers and podcasts: Podcasts on the NICE guidelines from authors for, and against, the new approach: https://soundcloud.com/bmjpodcasts/assessing-stable-chest-pain-a-nice-win-for-ct?in=bmjpodcasts/sets/heart-podcast https://soundcloud.com/bmjpodcasts/stable-chest-pain-assessment-revisited-the-case-against-cardiac-ct?in=bmjpodcasts/sets/heart-podcast Assessment of patients with stable chest pain : http://heart.bmj.com/content/early/2017/10/30/heartjnl-2017-311212 Challenges in delivering computed tomography coronary angiography as the first-line test for stable chest pain : http://heart.bmj.com/content/early/2017/11/14/heartjnl-2017-311846

Science
635
Clinical tips from Dr. Kathryn Ackerman on how to manage athletes with low energy availability
BMJ talk medicine

Dr. Kathryn Ackerman talks in this podcast to Dr. Liam West about the hot topic of energy availability in sport giving us clinical tips to manage athletes we suspect might be at risk of the consequences of low energy availability. Dr. Ackerman has undertaken board certification in Internal Medicine, Sports Medicine and Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism. This training has cumulated in positions as Medical Director of the Female Athlete Program at Boston Children's Hospital, Associate Director of the Sports Endocrine Research Lab at Massachusetts General Hospital, and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Kathryn’s research focuses on the Female Athlete Triad and the various aspects of Relative Energy in Deficiency in Sport. Related Articles IOC Concensus Statement: RED-S - http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/48/7/491 Misunderstanding the FAT - http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/48/20/1461 IOC RED-S Clinical Assessment Tool - http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/49/21/1354 Associated Podcasts AMSSM Sports Medcast- Female Athlete triad - http://bit.ly/2lBP7WJ Thoughts from the England Football CMO - http://bit.ly/2CpV6Zp Margo Mountjoy on the REDS debate - http://bit.ly/1KzYT04 Podcast Quote Low energy availability happens to others, it can happen to men, it can happen to disabled athletes.

Sports
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MVA85A trial investigation - press conference.
BMJ talk medicine

Trial MVA85A - monkey trials for a booster vaccine for BCG, developed by researchers at Oxford University, is the subject of an investigation published on bmj.com. Experts warn that today’s investigation is just one example of “a systematic failure” afflicting preclinical research and call for urgent action “to make animal research more fit for purpose as a valuable and reliable forerunner to clinical research in humans.” The press conference is led by Dr Fiona Godlee, the editor-in-chief of the BMJ, who provides a background to the investigation. The panel members are: Dr Deborah Cohen, author of the investigation and associate editor at the BMJ, talking about carrying out the investigation and the difficulty to obtain basic information Professor Paul Garner from the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, addressing the ineffectiveness of the current TB vaccine and also talking about the backlash he experienced after publishing a systematic review concluding that the animal studies results had been overstated Malcolm Macleod, from the University of Edinburgh, talking about the broader public health aspect Merel Ritskes-Hoitinga from the Department for Health Evidence in The Netherlands, addressing the quality of animal studies and the need for systematic reviews and Jonathan Kimmelman, from McGill University in Canada analysing the story from the perspective of biomedical ethics.

Science
159
Neoadjuvent treatment for breast cancer - not living up to the promise
BMJ talk medicine

Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer is a new strategy that was introduced towards the end of the 20th century with the aim of reducing tumour size - rendering an otherwise inoperable tumour operable, allowing more conservative surgery, and hopefully improving overall survival. Although data indicate that the first rationale remains valid, the others have not led to the desired outcomes. More conservative surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy can result in a higher rate of local recurrence, and, despite the earlier initiation of systemic treatment, no improvement in survival has been seen. Jayant Vaidya, professor of surgery and oncology and consultant breast cancer surgeon at University College London, joins us to explain why he is rethinking the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. Read the full analysis: http://www.bmj.com/content/360/bmj.j5913

Science
4,302
Primary Survey: the highlights of January 2018
BMJ talk medicine

Simon Carley, Associate Editor of EMJ, talks through the highlights of the January 2018 edition of the Emergency Medicine Journal, this month, picked by Ellen Webber (Editor-in-Chief, University of California, San Francisco, USA). Read the primary survey here: http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/1/1. Details of the papers mentioned in this podcast can be found below: Impact of Physician Navigators on productivity indicators in the ED - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/1/5 Tackling the demand for emergency department services: there are no silver bullets - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/1/3 Emergency consultants value medical scribes and most prefer to work with them, a few would rather not: a qualitative Australian study - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/1/12 Can an observational pain assessment tool improve time to analgesia for cognitively impaired older persons? A cluster randomised controlled trial - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/1/33 Failure of falls risk screening tools to predict outcome: a prospective cohort study - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/1/28 PREDICT prioritisation study: establishing the research priorities of paediatric emergency medicine physicians in Australia and New Zealand - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/1/39 Profile and outcomes of critically ill children in a lower middle-income country - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/1/52 Characteristics of youth agreeing to electronic sexually transmitted infection risk assessment in the emergency department - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/1/46 Waveform capnography: an alternative to physician gestalt in determining optimal intubating conditions after administration of paralytic agents - http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/1/62 Read the full January issue of EMJ here: http://emj.bmj.com/content/35/1

Science
824
Winter pressures - "You run the risk of dropping the ball"
BMJ talk medicine

Winter pressures on NHS services have kicked in a little bit earlier than usual. So here to discuss that, and also the issue of how local NHS leaders can support staff in times of extreme pressure. Discussing that with Rebecca Coombes, The BMJ’s head of news and views, are Matthew Inada-Kim, a consultant in acute and general medicine at Hampshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, and Joe Harrison, CEO of Milton Keynes Hospital NHS Foundation Trust.

Science
4,463
Routine supplementary oxygen for suspected acute myocardial infarction is no longer warranted
BMJ talk medicine

In this episode Helen Noble, Associate Editor of EBN, talks to Professor Tom Quinn, Professor of Nursing at the Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education, about the recently published paper "Routine supplementary oxygen for the normoxic patient with suspected acute myocardial infarction is no longer warranted". Read it here: http://ebn.bmj.com/content/21/1/13.

Science
201
Suspect, investigate, and diagnose acute respiratory distress syndrome
BMJ talk medicine

Acute respiratory distress syndrome was first described in 1967 and has become a defining condition in critical care. Around 40% of patients with ARDS will die, and survivors experience long term sequelae. No drug treatments exist for ARDS, however good supportive management reduces harm and improves outcome. In this podcast, John Laffey, professor of anaesthesiology at St Michael’s Hospital, Toronto and Brian Kavanagh, clinician-scientist, intensive care medicine at the University of Toronto take us through the background to diagnosis and treatment of ARDS. Cheryl Misak, professor of philosophy at the University of Toronto, and survivor of ARDS, also joins us to explain how she has faired in recovery. Read the full easily missed article: http://www.bmj.com/content/359/bmj.j5055

Science
4,392
January 2018: No alchemy for obesity
BMJ talk medicine

In this month’s podcast, James Cave (DTB Editor-in-Chief) and David Phizackerley (DTB Deputy Editor) discuss the importance of exercise, diet and behaviour modification in the management of obesity and consider the limitations of anti-obesity drugs. http://dtb.bmj.com/content/56/1/1 The editors also review the evidence for ▼patiromer, a cation exchange polymer, that has recently been marketed for the management of hyperkalaemia - http://dtb.bmj.com/content/56/1/6 and discuss the management of gout. http://dtb.bmj.com/content/56/1/9

Science
448
Can we predict aortic stenosis progression using blood biomarkers?
BMJ talk medicine

In this episode of the Heart podcast, Digital Media Editor Dr James Rudd is joined by Dr Atul Anand from the University of Edinburgh. They discuss his recent research paper about using cardiac myosin-binding protein C as a marker of progression of aortic stenosis. Link to published paper: http://heart.bmj.com/content/early/2017/12/01/heartjnl-2017-312257.

Science
1,131
Hope is important - early psychosis for the non-specialist doctor
BMJ talk medicine

Psychosis often emerges for the first time in adolescence and young adulthood. In around four out of five patients symptoms remit, but most experience relapses and further difficulties. Psychosis can be a frightening and bewildering experience for both patients and families. Early proactive support and intervention improves clinical outcomes, avoids costly and traumatic hospital admissions, and is preferred by patients and their families In this podcast,Sagnik Bhattacharyya, consultant psychiatrist at the Lambeth Hospital South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, and David Shiers, former GP, honorary reader in early psychosis at at Manchester University, join us to discuss early treatment - and why hope is important for both GPs and patients. Read the full practice article: http://www.bmj.com/content/357/bmj.j4578 And see the infographic on identification and management of psychotic disorders. http://www.bmj.com/content/bmj/suppl/2017/11/08/bmj.j4578.DC1/psychosis_v28.pdf

Science
4,137
Delayed cord clamping in preterm birth. The CORD trial
BMJ talk medicine

Associate Editor of ADC Fetal and Neonatal edition Jonathan Davis discusses delayed cord clamping in preterm birth with Jon Dorling (Nottingham Clinical Trials Unit, Queen’s Medical Centre, University of Nottingham, UK), Sam Oddie (Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, Hull York Medical School, University of York, UK). Related articles: Randomised trial of cord clamping and initial stabilisation at very preterm birth - http://fn.bmj.com/content/103/1/F6. Editorial: Timing is everything - http://fn.bmj.com/content/103/1/F2. Fifteen-minute consultation: stabilisation of the high-risk newborn infant beside the mother - http://ep.bmj.com/content/102/5/235.

Science
513
Botulism: a guide to recognition, reporting and referral - with Dr Claudia Kraft
BMJ talk medicine

Botulism: a guide to recognition, reporting and referral - with Dr Claudia Kraft Dr Claudia Kraft, MD, CCFP (EM), MSc, is an emergency physician, formerly a full-service family physician. She has practiced in the Canadian Arctic/subarctic for her entire medical career, first in Iqaluit, Nunavut and now in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories (where she lives with her partner Steve, their son Henry, and their husky). To learn more about Botulism, visit BMJ Best Practice (https://bestpractice.bmj.com/topics/en-gb/810). _ The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. The content of this podcast does not constitute medical advice and it is not intended to function as a substitute for a healthcare practitioner’s judgement, patient care or treatment. The views expressed by contributors are those of the speakers. BMJ does not endorse any views or recommendations discussed or expressed on this podcast. Listeners should also be aware that professionals in the field may have different opinions. By listening to this podcast, listeners agree not to use its content as the basis for their own medical treatment or for the medical treatment of others.

Learning
171
How to keep athletes healthy when travelling. David Dunne explains the best strategies
BMJ talk medicine

For the 2nd time on the BJSM podcast, Sean Carmody is joined by David Dunne to discuss practical considerations for the travelling athlete. During his time with Orreco, David has worked closely with athletes from professional golf and the NBA, most of whom face gruelling travel demands during competition. David and Sean delve into the strategies the practitioner can employ to help reduce the risk of illness, minimise the effects of jet lag, improve sleep and optimise performance. These strategies are complimented by lessons David has learnt during his PhD in Behaviour Change at Liverpool John Moores University. Key research linked below: Elite athletes travelling to international destinations >5 time zone differences from their home country have a 2–3-fold increased risk of illness: http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/46/11/816.

Sports
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Cats, dogs, and biomarkers of ageing.
BMJ talk medicine

The notion that animal companionship might be linked to human health can be traced to ancient writings and, with the first population based study conducted at least four decades ago. Although some empirical evidence links animal companionship with apparent protection against a series of important health outcomes in middle aged populations, including premature mortality, obesity, hypertension, and hyperlipidaemia, systematic reviews and position statements suggest that these associations are not universal. To investigate this further, the authors of this observational study, looked at the prospective link between pet ownership and a selected range of objective biomarkers of ageing proposed for use in large scale population based studies of older people. Richard Watt, professor of dental public health at University College London joins us to discuss their results. http://www.bmj.com/content/359/bmj.j5558

Science
4,732
Atoms: the ADC January 2018 highlights with Nick Brown
BMJ talk medicine

Nick Brown brings you the monthly Atoms - the highlights of the January 2018 issue in a few words. Read the highlights on the ADC website: http://adc.bmj.com/content/103/1/i.

Science
329
Small, medium, or a pint of wine?
BMJ talk medicine

Wine glasses come in a range of sizes, but the average wine glass in the UK today can hold almost ½ a litre. That wasn’t always the case - and a new analysis, on bmj.com takes a look at the changing size of wineglasses from 1700 until now. To discuss how the size of glass affects consumption we're joined by Theresa Marteau, director of the Behaviour and Health Research Unit at the University of Cambridge and Zorana Zupan, a research associate in the Unit. We're also joined by Matthew Winterbottom, curator of decorative arts at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford, to tell us about the history of wine drinking in the UK. Read the full analysis: http://www.bmj.com/content/359/bmj.j5623

Science
4,625
Taking the temperature of 37°C
BMJ talk medicine

Average body temperature is 37°C, right? That was the conclusion of Carl Wunderlich in his magnum opus, The Course of Temperature in Diseases - Wunderlich published that in 1868, following his extensive collection of body temperature readings - and 37°C stuck. But, it’s not as simple as that Philip Mackowiak, emeritus professor of medicine, and now history of medicine scholar in residence, at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, has been interested in temperature for a long time. He joins us to explain how Wunderlich measured temperature, and what he actually found. Read his editorial: http://www.bmj.com/content/359/bmj.j5697

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