LSE Podcasts tracks on Soundclound

#lsepodcasts

Adam Smith: what he thought, and why it matters [Audio]
LSE Podcasts

Speaker(s): Jesse Norman MP | At a time when economics and politics are both increasingly polarized between left and right, this book, Adam Smith: What He Thought, and Why it Matters, which Jesse Norman will discuss at this event, returns to intellectual first principles to recreate the lost centre of public debate. It offers a Smithian analysis of contemporary markets, predatory capitalism and the 2008 financial crash; it addresses crucial issues of inequality, human dignity and exploitation; and it provides a compelling explanation of why Smith is central to any attempt to defend and renew the market system. Jesse Norman MP (@Jesse_Norman) studied at Oxford, before completing a Masters and PhD in Philosophy at University College London. Before entering politics, he ran an educational project in Communist Eastern Europe and was a Director at Barclays. He has also been an Honorary Fellow at UCL, a Governor of the National Institute for Economic and Social Research, and a Visiting Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford. His previous books include a celebrated study of Edmund Burke. He currently serves as Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for the Department for Transport. Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics of Political Science and W. Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. The Department of Economics at LSE (@LSEEcon) is one of the largest economics departments in the world. Its size ensures that all areas of economics are strongly represented in both research and teaching. The Centre For Macroeconomics (@CFMUK) brings together world-class experts to carry out pioneering research on the global economic crisis and to help design policies that alleviate it.

News & Politics
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The Ballpark | Season 3, Episode 2: Arizona: Immigration politics in the Grand Canyon State
LSE Podcasts

As a part of our State of the States season, we’re diving deep into the political landscape of Arizona, the Grand Canyon State, and taking a close look at how immigration is playing out in the US Senate race of this border state

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LSE IQ Episode 16 | Do we need to rethink foreign aid?
LSE Podcasts

To subscribe on Apple podcasts please visit http://apple.co/2r40QPA or on Andriod http://subscribeonandroid.com/www.lse.ac.uk/assets/richmedia/webFeeds/lseiqpodcast_iTunesStore.xml or search for 'LSE IQ' in your favourite podcast app or visit http://lse.ac.uk/iq Welcome to LSE IQ, the monthly podcast from the London School of Economics and Political Science. This is the podcast where we ask some of the leading social scientists - and other experts - to answer intelligent questions about economics, politics or society. The UK spends a generous 0.7% of its Gross National Income on overseas development aid each year managed by its Department for International Development, or DFID. DFID’s website boasts that its work is building a safer, healthier and more prosperous world, not just for people in developing countries but also those in the UK. Despite this noble sentiment, not everyone supports the concept of aid, complaining that it’s too costly, that it aids corruption or that it is just another way for governments in developed countries to meddle in other nations’ affairs. Add to these objections the recent Oxfam scandal in Haiti – which has seen the organisation permanently banned from operating in the country due to claims of sexual exploitation - and is it time to rethink aid? This episode features: Dr Grace Akello, Visiting Professor at the Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa at LSE; Rafat Ali Al-Akhali, a Fellow of Practice – Strategic Projects at the Blavatnik School of Government, University of Oxford, Dr Duncan Green, Senior Strategic Adviser at Oxfam GB and a Professor in Practice in International Development at LSE, and Dr Ryan Jablonski, Assistant Professor in Political Science at LSE’s Department of Government. For further information about the podcast and all the related links visit http://lse.ac.uk/iq and please tell us what you think using the hashtag #LSE We are delighted to announce that the LSE IQ podcast, produced by a small team in LSE Communications Division, has won a 2018 Guardian University Award. It won the award in the category of ‘best marketing and comms campaign’ for ‘an imaginative university marketing or press campaign that imparts a clear message to engage its target audience and raise the profile of the university, or show it in a new light.’ To read more about the award please visit http://bit.ly/lseiqaward.

News & Politics
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Can Society Once Again Make Finance Servant, Not Master of the Economy? [Audio]
LSE Podcasts

Speaker(s): Ann Pettifor | In February 2018, Jeremy Corbyn accused bankers of taking the economy hostage, and said in a speech that Britain's financial sector will be "the servant of industry not the masters of all" if the Labour Party wins the next election. How realistic is that promise? In this lecture Ann Pettifor will argue that given the dependency of the finance sector on the largesse of the state and its taxpayers, a Labour government could transform the relationship between finance and industry. Ann Pettifor (@AnnPettifor) is the author of The Production of Money, director of PRIME economics, and a member of Labour’s Economic Advisory Committee. She was one of a few to predict the Great Financial Crisis in her 2006 book The Coming First World Debt Crisis. Ann Pettifor (@AnnPettifor) is the author of The Production of Money, director of PRIME economics, and a member of Labour’s Economic Advisory Committee. She was one of a few to predict the Great Financial Crisis in her 2006 book The Coming First World Debt Crisis. Natacha Postel-Vinay is Assistant Professor, Economic History Department, LSE.

News & Politics
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The Thatcher and Major Governments in Retrospect: reflections on 18 years in power [Audio]
LSE Podcasts

Speaker(s): Kenneth Clarke, Professor Tony Travers | This event, in memory of Maurice Fraser, will see former Chancellor of the Exchequer Kenneth Clarke in conversation with LSE's Tony Travers and Kevin Featherstone. Kenneth Clarke, MP for Rushcliffe since 1970, held several Ministerial offices in the Governments of Margaret Thatcher and John Major - as Secretary of State for Health, Secretary of State for Education and Science, Home Secretary and Chancellor of the Exchequer. He also served as Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice and Minister without Portfolio within the Coalition Government. As the Member of the House of Commons with the longest continuous service he is currently the Father of the House. Tony Travers is Interim Dean of the School of Public Policy at LSE. Kevin Featherstone is Head of the European Institute and Eleftherios Venizelos Professor of Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor of European Politics at the LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.

News & Politics
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Tracking the Rise in Global Economic Inequality: new evidence from the world inequality report 2018 [Audio]
LSE Podcasts

Speaker(s): Lucas Chancel, Duncan Green, Rebecca Simson, Paul Segal | The first World Inequality Report (WIR2018), documents a sharp rise in global economic inequality since the 1980s despite strong growth in emerging economies. It also discusses country-to-country inequality trajectories (including UK's wealth inequality dynamics) and highlights the importance of policy-making in the diverging trends observed across countries and world regions. The report, first launched in December last year at the Paris School of Economics, was coordinated by Facundo Alvaredo, Lucas Chancel, Thomas Piketty, Emmanuel Saez and Gabriel Zucman. It draws from new findings of the World Wealth and Income Database (a project which regroups more than 100 researchers all over the world) and provides the first systemic assessment of globalization in terms of income and wealth inequality since 1980. This discussion will examine the implications of the report findings.

News & Politics
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The Middle East after ISIS: what is at stake? [Audio]
LSE Podcasts

Speaker(s): Professor Gilles Kepel | ISIS has been defeated militarily, but the fight for the Middle East is just beginning. At this event Gilles Kepel, author of The Rise of Jihad in the West, discusses the future of the region and how it will shape global politics in the decades ahead. Hear more about how secterian conflict, bold new leaders, economic changes, and shifting geopolitics will be at the centre of the struggle for power and influence in the Middle East. Gilles Kepel is Chair of Middle East and Mediterranean Studies at École Normale Supérieure. Minouche Shafik is Director of LSE. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it.

News & Politics
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Flying the Flag for Openness: why liberalism still matters [Audio]
LSE Podcasts

Speaker(s): Sir Nick Clegg | Battered, bruised and blamed for so many of the world's problems, liberal values have found themselves under attack from left and right. But these values have multiple virtues and with many enduring strengths. In his inaugural lecture as a visiting professor in practice at LSE's School of Public Policy, Sir Nick Clegg will set out the case for liberal values at a time when stark social and generational divisions threaten to pull the country apart. If Open versus Closed is the pivotal divide in British politics today, then liberalism, a far richer philosophy than its critics allow, is best placed to bridge that divide. Sir Nick Clegg will explain why liberalism must be defended, must be cherished, but must also adapt to face the challenges of the future - and why there is nothing inconsistent with being both a liberal and a patriot. Nick Clegg (@nick_clegg) served as Deputy Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 2010 to 2015 and as Leader of the Liberal Democrats from 2007 to 2015. He was the MP for Sheffield Hallam from 2005 to 2017 and was a Member of the European Parliament from 1999 to 2004. He now heads a think-tank, Open Reason. Tony Travers is Interim Dean of the School of Public Policy at LSE. In September 2018, LSE’s School of Public Policy fully replaces the existing Institute of Public Affairs. The School of Public Policy will be the home for LSE’s Master of Public Administration (MPA), Executive MPA and Executive MPP degrees. Update, Tuesday 12 June: Due to unforeseen circumstances, Anne McElvoy is no longer able to speak at this event.

News & Politics
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Mastering the Multi-Generational Workplace [Audio]
LSE Podcasts

Speaker(s): Lorraine Ansell, Saj Jetha, Dr Sunita Malhotra, Nina Mohanty, Professor Sandy Pepper | Organisations are increasingly leveraging diversity to drive success, with generational diversity beginning to take centre stage. How will the arrival of Generation Z impact today’s working culture and how do you combine the wisdom of age with the exuberance of youth? An inter-generational panel explores the impact of five generations working alongside each other for the first time. Presenting their own experiences of building successful careers, and drawing on workplace innovations, the panellists offer creative new ideas for individuals of any generation to capitalise on opportunities at work, overcome challenges, and boost their collegiality. This event marks 30 years since the foundation of the CEMS Global Alliance in Management Education. Lorraine Ansell (@LAvoiceart) is an award-nominated voiceover artist and studio engineer. She previously worked for L’Oréal, YSL and Amnesty International and is a LSE/ESADE CEMS alumna. Saj Jetha is founder of the multi award-winning talent consultancy, The Smarty Train with the mission is to Unlock Talent. He is an LSE alumnus and trustee of The University of London’s Convocation Trust. Sunita Malhotra is Professor at Université Catholiquede Louvain, lecturer on the CEMS Masters in International Management and Managing Director, People Insights. Nina Mohanty (@ninamohanty) is Business Development Manager at Bud. Sandy Pepper is Professor of Management in Practice at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Christine Cote is Senior Lecturer in Practice and Academic Director of the CEMS Masters in International Management programme and the MBA Exchange at the London School of Economics. Jane Shaw is Which MBA? editor, The Economist. Jane will moderate the panel Q&A. The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a world-leading centre for research and education in business and management. CEMS (@cems_alliance), the Global Alliance in Management Education is an alliance of 31 business schools, 73 corporate and seven social partners, delivering the CEMS Masters in International Management to 1200 students with a network of over 12,000 alumni across the globe.

News & Politics
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The Ballpark | Season 3, Episode 1: Textbooks in Texas and Cars in California
LSE Podcasts

This season, we’re taking a look at how the states influence and shape America’s politics and policy. The stories, the elections, the policies, the political ecosystems, the people of these places are what drives the national narrative. And so, this season, “The State of the States” will take us to some of the most interesting and divided places in the United States.

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Finance, Competition and Innovation-Based Growth [Audio]
LSE Podcasts

Speaker(s): Professor Philippe Aghion Professor Philippe Aghion | This event is the annual Economica Coase lecture. Philippe Aghion is a professor at the College de France and LSE, and a fellow of the Econometric Society and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Oriana Bandiera (@orianabandiera) is a Professor of Economics and the Director of the Suntory and Toyota Centre for Economics and Related Disciplines (STICERD) at the London School of Economics. The Department of Economics at LSE (@LSEEcon) is one of the largest economics departments in the world. Its size ensures that all areas of economics are strongly represented in both research and teaching.

News & Politics
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LSE IQ Episode 15 | Are cryptocurrencies the future of money?
LSE Podcasts

To subscribe on Apple podcasts please visit http://apple.co/2r40QPA or on Andriod http://subscribeonandroid.com/www.lse.ac.uk/assets/richmedia/webFeeds/lseiqpodcast_iTunesStore.xml or search for 'LSE IQ' in your favourite podcast app or visit http://lse.ac.uk/iq Welcome to LSE IQ, the monthly podcast from the London School of Economics and Political Science. This is the podcast where we ask some of the leading social scientists - and other experts - to answer intelligent questions about economics, politics or society. In 2008 a person or group going under the pseudonym ‘Satoshi Nakamoto’ published a white paper setting out the fundamentals of a peer- to- peer electronic cash system called bitcoin. This would do away with the need to rely on financial institutions, acting as trusted third parties, to process electronic payments. Instead money could be sent directly from one party to another. Transactions would be verified and recorded permanently on the blockchain. This digital ledger would be distributed across a large network of computers and guard against a risk specific to digital currency - that it can be fraudulently spent twice. Technology, Satoshi Nakamoto claimed, would replace the need for trust. Bitcoin was the first decentralised cryptocurrency, and hundreds of others have been created since. In this episode of LSE IQ, Sue Windebank asks, are cryptocurrencies the future of money, a speculative bubble that will burst, or something else? This episode features: Dr Tatiana Cutts, Assistant Professor, LSE Department of Law Professor Nigel Dodd, LSE Department of Sociology; Dr Garrick Hileman, Research Associate, University of Cambridge and LSE, Dr Natacha Postel-Vinay, Assistant Professor, LSE Department of Economic History. For further information about the podcast and all the related links visit http://lse.ac.uk/iq and please tell us what you think using the hashtag #LSE We are delighted to announce that the LSE IQ podcast, produced by a small team in LSE Communications Division, has won a 2018 Guardian University Award. It won the award in the category of ‘best marketing and comms campaign’ for ‘an imaginative university marketing or press campaign that imparts a clear message to engage its target audience and raise the profile of the university, or show it in a new light.’ To read more about the award please visit http://bit.ly/lseiqaward.

News & Politics
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The Challenge to Diversity and Democracy in India Today [Audio]
LSE Podcasts

Speaker(s): Yogendra Yadav | What can we learn from the current challenge to the idea of a diverse and democratic India? Does this demand rethinking the idea of India as a “State-Nation”? Yogendra Yadav (@_YogendraYadav) is a nationally-renowned Indian psephologist, an expert on comparative democracy and National President of the newly-formed Swaraj India party. Robin Archer is Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme at LSE. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry.

News & Politics
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Football [Audio]
LSE Podcasts

Speaker(s): Professor Simon Critchley, Dr Gerald Moore, Dr Emily Ryall | ‘All that I know most surely about morality and obligations, I owe to football’, observed Albert Camus. And it is football, above all other sports, that so many philosophers revere. So there’s everything to play for in this panel discussion exploring the relationship between football and philosophy. We give it 110% in our exploration of what makes for a ‘good game’ and whether philosophical principles can be put into play on the pitch. Simon Critchley is Han Jonas Professor of Philosophy, New School for Social Research, NY. Gerald Moore is Associate Professor of French, University of Durham. Emily Ryall is a Reader in Applied Philosophy, University of Gloucestershire. Shahidha Bari is a Fellow, the Forum; Senior Lecturer in Romanticism, Queen Mary University of London. The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK

News & Politics
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How to Lose a Referendum [Audio]
LSE Podcasts

Speaker(s): Jason Farrell, Paul Goldsmith | In their book, How To Lose A Referendum, which they will talk about at this event, Sky News senior political correspondent Jason Farrell and political blogger and economics and politics teacher Paul Goldsmith identify eighteen key reasons why the UK made its choice, from Britain’s absence at the birth of the European project to the inflammatory rhetoric of one Nigel Farage, and everything in between. The book is the product of extensive and refreshingly frank interviews with the key players from both campaigns coupled with a wide-ranging exploration of the historical context around Britain’s departure. Why was a project designed for common peace and prosperity ultimately so hard to defend? Jason Farrell (@JasonFarrellSky) is a senior political correspondent for Sky News. Paul Goldsmith (@PaulGoldsmith73) is a politics and economics teacher at Latymer Upper School and author of the Goldblog. Tony Travers is Director of the Institute of Public Affairs, LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The Institute of Public Affairs (@LSEPubAffairs) is one of the world's leading centres of public policy. We aim to debate and address some of the major issues of our time, whether international or national, through our established teaching programmes, our research and our highly innovative public engagement initiatives.

News & Politics
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The French Revolution: one year on [Audio]
LSE Podcasts

Speaker(s): Professor Jean Pisani-Ferry, Christine Ockrent | The lecture will take stock of the transformation of French economic policy following the sweeping electoral success of Emmanuel Macron, and appraise its achievements. Jean Pisani-Ferry (@pisaniferry) is a professor at Sciences Po Paris and the Hertie School of Governance in Berlin, and Mercator Senior Fellow at Bruegel. He was the Director for Programme and Ideas of Emmanuel Macron’s presidential campaign. Christine Ockrent (@Ockrent) is a journalist and broadcaster; former Chief Operating Officer of France 24 and RFI; Editor in Chief of the weekly news magazine L’Express. Iain Begg (@IainBeggLSE) is Professorial Research Fellow at the European Institute. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The Dahrendorf Forum (@DahrendorfForum) is a joint initiative between the LSE and the Hertie School of Governance, funded by Mercator Stiftung.

News & Politics
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Unelected Power: the quest for legitimacy in central banking and the regulatory state [Audio]
LSE Podcasts

Speaker(s): Paul Tucker | Central bankers pull the levers of our economic well-being. In this lecture Paul Tucker explains how to ensure agents of the administrative state remain stewards of the common good. Central bankers have emerged from the financial crisis as the third great pillar of unelected power alongside the judiciary and the military. They pull the regulatory and financial levers of our economic well-being, yet unlike democratically elected leaders, their power does not come directly from the people. In his new book, Unelected Power: The Quest for Legitimacy in Central Banking and the Regulatory State, Paul Tucker lays out the principles needed to ensure that central bankers, technocrats, regulators, and other agents of the administrative state remain stewards of the common good and do not become overmighty citizens. He draws on a wealth of personal experience from his many years in domestic and international policymaking to tackle the big issues raised by unelected power, and enriches his discussion with examples from the United States, Britain, France, Germany, and the European Union. Paul Tucker is a fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School and chair of the Systemic Risk Council. Previously, he was Deputy Governor at the Bank of England, sitting on its monetary policy, financial stability, and prudential policy committees. Internationally, he was a member of the G20 Financial Stability Board, leading its work on too big to fail; a director of the Bank for International Settlements, and chair of its Committee for Payment and Settlement Systems. Charles Goodhart Emeritus Professor of Banking and Finance, FMG, LSE. The Financial Markets Group Research Centre (@FMG_LSE) was established in 1987 at the LSE. The FMG is a leading centre in Europe for policy research into financial markets. The Systemic Risk Centre (@LSE_SRC) was set up to study the risks that may trigger the next financial crisis and to develop tools to help policymakers and financial institutions become better prepared.

News & Politics
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Collusion: how central bankers rigged the world [Audio]
LSE Podcasts

Speaker(s): Nomi Prins | In her new book, which she will talk about at this event, former Wall Street insider Nomi Prins shows how the 2007–2008 financial crisis turbo-boosted the influence of central bankers and triggered a massive shift in the world order. Central banks and international institutions like the IMF have overstepped their traditional mandates by directing the flow of epic sums of fabricated money without any checks or balances. Meanwhile, the open door between private and central banking has ensured endless opportunities for market manipulation and asset bubbles—with government support. Journalist and former global investment bank executive Nomi Prins (@nomiprins) is the author of six previous books. This event marks the publication of her latest book, Collusion: How Central Bankers Rigged the World. Wouter den Haan is Co-director for the Centre for Macroeconomics and Professor of Economics at LSE. The Department of Economics at LSE (@LSEEcon) is one of the largest economics departments in the world. Its size ensures that all areas of economics are strongly represented in both research and teaching. The Centre For Macroeconomics (@CFMUK) brings together world-class experts to carry out pioneering research on the global economic crisis and to help design policies that alleviate it.

News & Politics
1,454
The HotSeat | 18 May 2018 | Tony Travers discusses the 2018 Local Elections
LSE Podcasts

What did the 2018 Local Elections tell us about the current landscape of British Politics? Professor Tony Travers gives us his analysis. Watch the latest episodes of #LSEHotSeat on GovBlog - http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/government/hotseat/ YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SVJqtljv4Ho

News & Politics
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Texas, Trump and the Future of America [Audio]
LSE Podcasts

Speaker(s): Lawrence Wright | Come learn about the most controversial state in America and what it tells us about Donald Trump and the future of the US. This event marks the publications of Lawrence's new book, God Save Texas: A Journey into the Future of America. Lawrence Wright (@lawrence_wright) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning author, screenwriter, playwright and a staff writer for The New Yorker magazine. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Department Head of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House, Royal Institute of International Affairs. The United States Centre (@LSE_US) at LSE is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America.

News & Politics
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