LSE Podcasts tracks on Soundclound

#lsepodcasts

The Ballpark | Season 3, Episode 3: Healthcare politics and policy in Tennessee
LSE Podcasts

As a part of our State of the States season, we’re taking a look at some of the most important elections in the 2018 midterms, and this episode, we’re going to Tennessee, the volunteer state, to see how healthcare is impacting one of the most competitive Senate races in the country.

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Money and Government: a challenge to mainstream economics [Audio]
LSE Podcasts

Speaker(s): Professor Lord Skidelsky | Robert Skidelsky's new book, Money and Government: A Challenge to Mainstream Economics, which he will discuss in this lecture, is a major challenge to economic orthodoxy, contesting the dominant view that money and government should play only a minor role in economic life and emboldening the next generation to break free from their conceptual prisons. Robert Skidelsky is Emeritus Professor of Political Economy at the University of Warwick. His three volume biography of John Maynard Keynes (1983, 1992, 2000) received numerous prizes. He was made a life peer in 1991, and a Fellow of the British Academy in 1994. Camille Landais is Professor of Economics at LSE, Co-Editor, Journal of Public Economics and Director, CEPR Public Economics Program.

News & Politics
680
How Does The Euro Shield Europe From Future Crises? [Audio]
LSE Podcasts

Speaker(s): Mário Centeno | In his lecture Eurogroup President Mário Centeno will speak about the push to reform the Euro and the politics behind it, and discuss how the single currency could shield the European economy from both internal and external shocks in the future. Mário Centeno (@mariofcenteno) was elected President of the Eurogroup on 4 December 2017 by the Euro area finance ministers. Since December 2017 he also serves as Chair of the Board of Governors of the European Stability Mechanism. He was sworn in as Finance Minister of Portugal in November 2015. Mr Centeno is an economist and University Professor who only began his political career in 2015. Before that he held several positions in Portugal’s Central Bank where he started as an economist in 2000. Mr Centeno has an academic background with two Masters – the first one in Applied Mathematics, by ISEG-UTL in 1993, the second one in Economics, by Harvard University, USA, in 1998 – and a PhD in Economics, by Harvard University, USA, concluded in 2000. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.

News & Politics
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LSE IQ Episode 18 | How do stories help us understand the world?
LSE Podcasts

To subscribe on Apple podcasts please visit http://apple.co/2r40QPA or on Andriod http://subscribeonandroid.com/www.lse.ac.uk/assets/richmedia/webFeeds/lseiqpodcast_iTunesStore.xml or search for 'LSE IQ' in your favourite podcast app or visit http://lse.ac.uk/iq Welcome to LSE IQ, the monthly award-winning podcast from the London School of Economics and Political Science. This is the podcast where we ask some of the leading social scientists - and other experts - to answer intelligent questions about economics, politics or society. “The human species thinks in metaphors and learns through stories.” So says Mary Catherine Bateson, writer and cultural anthropologist. Narratives are all around us, from the TV shows we watch, the newspapers we read to the anecdotes we tell. But how do narratives shape our understanding of the world, ourselves and the people around us? Do they distort or clarify our view of reality? In this episode James Rattee asks, ‘How do stories help us understand the world?’ This episode features the following academics: Richard Bronk, LSE European Institute, Professor Lib Taylor, University of Reading’s Department of Film, Theatre & Television and Professor Mary Morgan, LSE Department of Economic History. If you’ve been affected by the issues in this podcast, you could contact the Samaritans on 116 123. For further information about the podcast and all the related links visit http://lse.ac.uk/iq and please tell us what you think using the hashtag #LSE

News & Politics
1,123
In Conversation with Rahul Gandhi [Audio]
LSE Podcasts

Speaker(s): Rahul Gandhi | Rahul Gandhi (@RahulGandhi), President of the Indian National Congress and member of the Parliament of India will be in conversation with LSE’s Mukulika Banerjee (@MukulikaB), Director of the South Asia Centre, and Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at LSE. This event is in collaboration with the National Indian Students and Alumni Union (UK) and marks the launch of the NISAU India Perspective Townhall. Established in June 2015, the South Asia Centre (@SAsiaLSE) harnesses LSE's research & academic focus on South Asia, whose particularities constantly challenge conventional thinking in the social sciences.

News & Politics
671
Crashed: how a decade of financial crises changed the world [Audio]
LSE Podcasts

Speaker(s): Professor Adam Tooze | In September 2008 the Great Financial Crisis, triggered by the collapse of Lehman brothers, shook the world. A decade later its spectre still haunts us. As the appalling scope and scale of the crash was revealed, the financial institutions that had symbolised the West's triumph since the end of the Cold War, seemed - through greed, malice and incompetence - to be about to bring the entire system to its knees. In this talk Adam Tooze will talk about his new book, Crashed: How a Decade of Financial Crises Changed the World. Crashed is an analysis of what happened and how we were rescued from something even worse - but at a price which continues to undermine democracy across Europe and the United States. Gnawing away at our institutions are the many billions of dollars which were conjured up to prevent complete collapse. Over and over again, the end of the crisis has been announced, but it continues to hound us - whether in Greece or Ukraine, whether through Brexit or Trump. Adam Tooze (@adam_tooze) is the author of The Deluge and The Wages of Destruction.The Wages of Destruction won the Wolfson Prize for History and the Longman-History Today Book of the Year Prize. He has taught at Cambridge and Yale and is now Kathryn and Shelby Cullom Davis Professor of History at Columbia University. He is an alumnus of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Tim Frost is a Chair of credit asset manager Cairn Capital and a Trustee of Step Change the debt charity. He served in the British Army in Germany and the Falkland Islands and ran a hostel for homeless people before spending 15 years at JP Morgan, where he helped to establish the credit derivatives business. Tim is an Emeritus Governor and alumnus of the London School of Economics and Political Science, and was appointed a Director of the Bank of England in 2012.

News & Politics
1,113
LSE IQ Episode 17 | Are we entering a new Cold War? [Audio]
LSE Podcasts

Speaker(s): Professor Anne Applebaum, Dr Cristian Nitoiu, Peter Pomerantsev | We hope you’ve enjoyed listening to this year’s programme of public events and that you’ll stay tuned for the exciting programme of events we have lined up, for the new academic year. In the meantime we have another podcast series we think you might enjoy. LSE IQ is an award-winning monthly podcast in which we ask some of the smartest social scientists - and other experts - to answer intelligent questions about economics, politics or society. Recent episodes have tackled questions such as ‘Are cryptocurrencies the future of money?’, ‘How do you win an argument?’ and ‘Do we need to rethink foreign aid?’. To give you a taste of LSEIQ the latest episode, which asks ‘Are we entering a new Cold War?’, is available for you here in our public events podcast feed. To listen to other episodes, search for LSE IQ in your favourite podcast app or visit lse.ac.uk/iq. We’d like to hear your opinion too so please join the discussion on social media using the hashtag LSEIQ and please consider leaving a review on the Apple podcasts app as this makes the podcast easier to find.

News & Politics
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LSE IQ Episode 17 | Are we entering a new Cold War?
LSE Podcasts

To subscribe on Apple podcasts please visit http://apple.co/2r40QPA or on Andriod http://subscribeonandroid.com/www.lse.ac.uk/assets/richmedia/webFeeds/lseiqpodcast_iTunesStore.xml or search for 'LSE IQ' in your favourite podcast app or visit http://lse.ac.uk/iq Welcome to LSE IQ, the monthly award-winning podcast from the London School of Economics and Political Science. This is the podcast where we ask some of the leading social scientists - and other experts - to answer intelligent questions about economics, politics or society. In this episode, Joanna Bale asks ‘Are we entering a new Cold War?’ She talks to LSE’s Anne Applebaum, Cristian Nitoiu and Peter Pomerantsev. For further information about the podcast and all the related links visit http://lse.ac.uk/iq and please tell us what you think using the hashtag #LSE

News & Politics
1,692
Peak Inequality - Britain's Ticking Time Bomb [Audio]
LSE Podcasts

Speaker(s): Professor Danny Dorling | When we think of economic inequality we tend to think of a trend that is ever rising and destined to continue rising; that is far from inevitable. There are many statistics today that point at Britain being at a peak of inequality. However, having allowed the gaps between us to grow so wide has had dire implications for our health, housing, education, demography, politics and future. Danny Dorling highlights these and discusses what it will take to begin to descend from the peak of inequality. Danny Dorling (@dannydorling) is a Professor of Human Geography at the University of Oxford. He has also worked in Sheffield, Newcastle, Bristol, Leeds and New Zealand, went to university in Newcastle upon Tyne, and grew up in Oxford. He has published over forty books including many atlases and All That is Solid in 2014; Injustice: Why social inequalities still persist in 2015; A Better Politics: How government can make us happier in 2016; The Equality Effect in 2017; and Do We Need Economic Inequality? – in 2018. His latest book is Peak Inequality - Britain’s Ticking Time Bomb. Jonathan Hopkin (@jrhopkin) is Associate Professor of Comparative Politics, Department of Government, LSE.

News & Politics
1,218
Adam Smith: what he thought, and why it matters [Audio]
LSE Podcasts

Speaker(s): Jesse Norman MP | At a time when economics and politics are both increasingly polarized between left and right, this book, Adam Smith: What He Thought, and Why it Matters, which Jesse Norman will discuss at this event, returns to intellectual first principles to recreate the lost centre of public debate. It offers a Smithian analysis of contemporary markets, predatory capitalism and the 2008 financial crash; it addresses crucial issues of inequality, human dignity and exploitation; and it provides a compelling explanation of why Smith is central to any attempt to defend and renew the market system. Jesse Norman MP (@Jesse_Norman) studied at Oxford, before completing a Masters and PhD in Philosophy at University College London. Before entering politics, he ran an educational project in Communist Eastern Europe and was a Director at Barclays. He has also been an Honorary Fellow at UCL, a Governor of the National Institute for Economic and Social Research, and a Visiting Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford. His previous books include a celebrated study of Edmund Burke. He currently serves as Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for the Department for Transport. Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics of Political Science and W. Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. The Department of Economics at LSE (@LSEEcon) is one of the largest economics departments in the world. Its size ensures that all areas of economics are strongly represented in both research and teaching. The Centre For Macroeconomics (@CFMUK) brings together world-class experts to carry out pioneering research on the global economic crisis and to help design policies that alleviate it.

News & Politics
1,513
The Ballpark | Season 3, Episode 2: Arizona: Immigration politics in the Grand Canyon State
LSE Podcasts

As a part of our State of the States season, we’re diving deep into the political landscape of Arizona, the Grand Canyon State, and taking a close look at how immigration is playing out in the US Senate race of this border state

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LSE IQ Episode 16 | Do we need to rethink foreign aid?
LSE Podcasts

To subscribe on Apple podcasts please visit http://apple.co/2r40QPA or on Andriod http://subscribeonandroid.com/www.lse.ac.uk/assets/richmedia/webFeeds/lseiqpodcast_iTunesStore.xml or search for 'LSE IQ' in your favourite podcast app or visit http://lse.ac.uk/iq Welcome to LSE IQ, the monthly podcast from the London School of Economics and Political Science. This is the podcast where we ask some of the leading social scientists - and other experts - to answer intelligent questions about economics, politics or society. The UK spends a generous 0.7% of its Gross National Income on overseas development aid each year managed by its Department for International Development, or DFID. DFID’s website boasts that its work is building a safer, healthier and more prosperous world, not just for people in developing countries but also those in the UK. Despite this noble sentiment, not everyone supports the concept of aid, complaining that it’s too costly, that it aids corruption or that it is just another way for governments in developed countries to meddle in other nations’ affairs. Add to these objections the recent Oxfam scandal in Haiti – which has seen the organisation permanently banned from operating in the country due to claims of sexual exploitation - and is it time to rethink aid? This episode features: Dr Grace Akello, Visiting Professor at the Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa at LSE; Rafat Ali Al-Akhali, a Fellow of Practice – Strategic Projects at the Blavatnik School of Government, University of Oxford, Dr Duncan Green, Senior Strategic Adviser at Oxfam GB and a Professor in Practice in International Development at LSE, and Dr Ryan Jablonski, Assistant Professor in Political Science at LSE’s Department of Government. For further information about the podcast and all the related links visit http://lse.ac.uk/iq and please tell us what you think using the hashtag #LSE We are delighted to announce that the LSE IQ podcast, produced by a small team in LSE Communications Division, has won a 2018 Guardian University Award. It won the award in the category of ‘best marketing and comms campaign’ for ‘an imaginative university marketing or press campaign that imparts a clear message to engage its target audience and raise the profile of the university, or show it in a new light.’ To read more about the award please visit http://bit.ly/lseiqaward.

News & Politics
1,184
Can Society Once Again Make Finance Servant, Not Master of the Economy? [Audio]
LSE Podcasts

Speaker(s): Ann Pettifor | In February 2018, Jeremy Corbyn accused bankers of taking the economy hostage, and said in a speech that Britain's financial sector will be "the servant of industry not the masters of all" if the Labour Party wins the next election. How realistic is that promise? In this lecture Ann Pettifor will argue that given the dependency of the finance sector on the largesse of the state and its taxpayers, a Labour government could transform the relationship between finance and industry. Ann Pettifor (@AnnPettifor) is the author of The Production of Money, director of PRIME economics, and a member of Labour’s Economic Advisory Committee. She was one of a few to predict the Great Financial Crisis in her 2006 book The Coming First World Debt Crisis. Ann Pettifor (@AnnPettifor) is the author of The Production of Money, director of PRIME economics, and a member of Labour’s Economic Advisory Committee. She was one of a few to predict the Great Financial Crisis in her 2006 book The Coming First World Debt Crisis. Natacha Postel-Vinay is Assistant Professor, Economic History Department, LSE.

News & Politics
1,355
The Thatcher and Major Governments in Retrospect: reflections on 18 years in power [Audio]
LSE Podcasts

Speaker(s): Kenneth Clarke, Professor Tony Travers | This event, in memory of Maurice Fraser, will see former Chancellor of the Exchequer Kenneth Clarke in conversation with LSE's Tony Travers and Kevin Featherstone. Kenneth Clarke, MP for Rushcliffe since 1970, held several Ministerial offices in the Governments of Margaret Thatcher and John Major - as Secretary of State for Health, Secretary of State for Education and Science, Home Secretary and Chancellor of the Exchequer. He also served as Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice and Minister without Portfolio within the Coalition Government. As the Member of the House of Commons with the longest continuous service he is currently the Father of the House. Tony Travers is Interim Dean of the School of Public Policy at LSE. Kevin Featherstone is Head of the European Institute and Eleftherios Venizelos Professor of Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor of European Politics at the LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.

News & Politics
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Tracking the Rise in Global Economic Inequality: new evidence from the world inequality report 2018 [Audio]
LSE Podcasts

Speaker(s): Lucas Chancel, Duncan Green, Rebecca Simson, Paul Segal | The first World Inequality Report (WIR2018), documents a sharp rise in global economic inequality since the 1980s despite strong growth in emerging economies. It also discusses country-to-country inequality trajectories (including UK's wealth inequality dynamics) and highlights the importance of policy-making in the diverging trends observed across countries and world regions. The report, first launched in December last year at the Paris School of Economics, was coordinated by Facundo Alvaredo, Lucas Chancel, Thomas Piketty, Emmanuel Saez and Gabriel Zucman. It draws from new findings of the World Wealth and Income Database (a project which regroups more than 100 researchers all over the world) and provides the first systemic assessment of globalization in terms of income and wealth inequality since 1980. This discussion will examine the implications of the report findings.

News & Politics
821
The Middle East after ISIS: what is at stake? [Audio]
LSE Podcasts

Speaker(s): Professor Gilles Kepel | ISIS has been defeated militarily, but the fight for the Middle East is just beginning. At this event Gilles Kepel, author of The Rise of Jihad in the West, discusses the future of the region and how it will shape global politics in the decades ahead. Hear more about how secterian conflict, bold new leaders, economic changes, and shifting geopolitics will be at the centre of the struggle for power and influence in the Middle East. Gilles Kepel is Chair of Middle East and Mediterranean Studies at École Normale Supérieure. Minouche Shafik is Director of LSE. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it.

News & Politics
1,022
Flying the Flag for Openness: why liberalism still matters [Audio]
LSE Podcasts

Speaker(s): Sir Nick Clegg | Battered, bruised and blamed for so many of the world's problems, liberal values have found themselves under attack from left and right. But these values have multiple virtues and with many enduring strengths. In his inaugural lecture as a visiting professor in practice at LSE's School of Public Policy, Sir Nick Clegg will set out the case for liberal values at a time when stark social and generational divisions threaten to pull the country apart. If Open versus Closed is the pivotal divide in British politics today, then liberalism, a far richer philosophy than its critics allow, is best placed to bridge that divide. Sir Nick Clegg will explain why liberalism must be defended, must be cherished, but must also adapt to face the challenges of the future - and why there is nothing inconsistent with being both a liberal and a patriot. Nick Clegg (@nick_clegg) served as Deputy Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 2010 to 2015 and as Leader of the Liberal Democrats from 2007 to 2015. He was the MP for Sheffield Hallam from 2005 to 2017 and was a Member of the European Parliament from 1999 to 2004. He now heads a think-tank, Open Reason. Tony Travers is Interim Dean of the School of Public Policy at LSE. In September 2018, LSE’s School of Public Policy fully replaces the existing Institute of Public Affairs. The School of Public Policy will be the home for LSE’s Master of Public Administration (MPA), Executive MPA and Executive MPP degrees. Update, Tuesday 12 June: Due to unforeseen circumstances, Anne McElvoy is no longer able to speak at this event.

News & Politics
921
Mastering the Multi-Generational Workplace [Audio]
LSE Podcasts

Speaker(s): Lorraine Ansell, Saj Jetha, Dr Sunita Malhotra, Nina Mohanty, Professor Sandy Pepper | Organisations are increasingly leveraging diversity to drive success, with generational diversity beginning to take centre stage. How will the arrival of Generation Z impact today’s working culture and how do you combine the wisdom of age with the exuberance of youth? An inter-generational panel explores the impact of five generations working alongside each other for the first time. Presenting their own experiences of building successful careers, and drawing on workplace innovations, the panellists offer creative new ideas for individuals of any generation to capitalise on opportunities at work, overcome challenges, and boost their collegiality. This event marks 30 years since the foundation of the CEMS Global Alliance in Management Education. Lorraine Ansell (@LAvoiceart) is an award-nominated voiceover artist and studio engineer. She previously worked for L’Oréal, YSL and Amnesty International and is a LSE/ESADE CEMS alumna. Saj Jetha is founder of the multi award-winning talent consultancy, The Smarty Train with the mission is to Unlock Talent. He is an LSE alumnus and trustee of The University of London’s Convocation Trust. Sunita Malhotra is Professor at Université Catholiquede Louvain, lecturer on the CEMS Masters in International Management and Managing Director, People Insights. Nina Mohanty (@ninamohanty) is Business Development Manager at Bud. Sandy Pepper is Professor of Management in Practice at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Christine Cote is Senior Lecturer in Practice and Academic Director of the CEMS Masters in International Management programme and the MBA Exchange at the London School of Economics. Jane Shaw is Which MBA? editor, The Economist. Jane will moderate the panel Q&A. The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a world-leading centre for research and education in business and management. CEMS (@cems_alliance), the Global Alliance in Management Education is an alliance of 31 business schools, 73 corporate and seven social partners, delivering the CEMS Masters in International Management to 1200 students with a network of over 12,000 alumni across the globe.

News & Politics
1,067
The Ballpark | Season 3, Episode 1: Textbooks in Texas and Cars in California
LSE Podcasts

This season, we’re taking a look at how the states influence and shape America’s politics and policy. The stories, the elections, the policies, the political ecosystems, the people of these places are what drives the national narrative. And so, this season, “The State of the States” will take us to some of the most interesting and divided places in the United States.

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Finance, Competition and Innovation-Based Growth [Audio]
LSE Podcasts

Speaker(s): Professor Philippe Aghion Professor Philippe Aghion | This event is the annual Economica Coase lecture. Philippe Aghion is a professor at the College de France and LSE, and a fellow of the Econometric Society and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Oriana Bandiera (@orianabandiera) is a Professor of Economics and the Director of the Suntory and Toyota Centre for Economics and Related Disciplines (STICERD) at the London School of Economics. The Department of Economics at LSE (@LSEEcon) is one of the largest economics departments in the world. Its size ensures that all areas of economics are strongly represented in both research and teaching.

News & Politics
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