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एनएल चर्चा 29: धारा 377, जियो इंस्टिट्युट, शशि थरूर व अन्य
Newslaundry

सुप्रीम कोर्ट में धारा 377 पर जारी सुनवाई, शशि थरूर का थिरुवनंतपुरम में हिंदू पाकिस्तान संबंधी बयान, मानव संसाधन व विकास मंत्रालय द्वारा अंबानी के जियो इंस्टिट्युट को इंस्टिट्युट ऑफ प्रॉमिनेंस का दर्जा दिया जाना, रामगढ मॉब लिंचिंग के दोषियों को केन्द्रीय मंत्री जयंत सिन्हा द्वारा स्वागत किया जाना व अन्य इस हफ्ते न्यूज़लॉन्ड्री चर्चा के प्रमुख विषय रहे. राजकमल प्रकाशन समूह के संपादकीय निदेशक सत्यानंद निरुपम चर्चा के विशिष्ट अतिथि थे. इसके साथ पैनल में न्यूज़लॉन्ड्री के संवाददाता अमित भारद्वाज और रोहिण कुमार भी शामिल रहे. चर्चा का संचालन न्यूज़लॉन्ड्री के कार्यकारी संपादक अतुल चौरसिया ने किया.

News & Politics
2,733
Chhota Hafta – Episode 180
Newslaundry

NL Hafta has gone behind the paywall, but we love our listeners. So, here's a little sneak peek into the complete episode where the panel discusses everything from judges’ vacation terms, Section 377, Jayant Sinha’s garlanding of convicted lynchers who were out on bail, to the SC-Centre Taj Mahal tussle, the misogynistic adultery law, Netflix’s Sacred Games and more.

News & Politics
2,449
Hafta 177: BJP-PDP breakup, Shujaat Bukhari's murder, Airtel row and more
Newslaundry

In this week’s Hafta, Rituparna Chatterjee, Consulting Editor, Reader's Digest and India Today magazine, joins Abhinandan Sekhri who was missing from last week's podcast. Manisha Pande, Raman Kirpal and Anand Vardhan are also on the panel. The fallout between the Bharatiya Janata Party and the People’s Democratic Party, in addition to Arvind Kejriwal’s nine-day-long protest, is discussed in depth by the panel. The Airtel controversy over a customer refusing services from a Muslim customer care executive is also debated upon. The killing of Rising Kashmir editor-in-chief Shujaat Bukhari has left our panel in complete dismay. The suicide of Rohit Vemula is revisited as well. Abhinandan begins the discussion with the murder of Shujaat Bukhari and asks, “Why is this getting so much traction and not other murders?” Raman talks about the incident taking place in a conflicted area like Kashmir. He says, "He is confounded about “what really triggered his killing?” Rituparna quotes Shujaat from his interview in 2006, “You don't know anymore who your enemies are” and talks about the reality of this statement in today’s times. Manisha talks about the tendency of being “labelled as an India sympathiser” if one is a moderate or reports against the militants in Jammu and Kashmir. Rituparna moves on to discuss the BJP pulling out of an “unlikely alliance” with People's Democratic Party. Anand refers to this move as a “standard tool for coming out of any confusion when you are in a coalition”. Abhinandan questions the timing of this decision. Raman states, “Almost the entire youth of Kashmir have been radicalised,” adding, “withdrawing from the PDP has more to do with politics." The “tussle” between the Delhi state government and the Lieutenant Governor of Delhi has received varied responses from the panel. Abhinandan asks, “What do you make of what happened and where we are?” Anand observes, “I think the AAP was in it for retrieving political capital of a contrarian party...the moral capital which had suffered substantial erosion with its apologies, with giving tickets to people who in public perception were not deserving of Rajya Sabha seats...” He adds, “The AAP also went on an obfuscation because the blocking of ministerial work is an afterthought. It still didn’t address the original allegation of (alleged) violence against the topmost bureaucrat of Delhi.” Rituparna says that the Congress has yet again ‘missed the bus’.  She points out that the coalition drive of the Congress cannot work in Delhi with the AAP because it’s a ‘natural rival’. Raman says, “I found IAS officers -- former and the serving -- all of them were trying to explain that we’re not on a strike.” Abhinandan comments, “AAP’s whole template is to make an event a talking point and then that goes viral...” He adds, “They (AAP) have been unable to create[turn] any event [into a talking point] since they’ve formed the government.” The panel discusses a recent Twitter row that involved Airtel and a customer. The customer denied the services of a particular customer support executive since the Airtel personnel interacting with her was a Muslim. Rituparna says, “Brands need to immediately hire people to handle a crisis of this sort...because the crisis of this sort is only going to increase.” The panel also discusses Rohit Vemula’s mother's case who was allegedly offered money to speak against Prime Minister Narendra Modi and more.

News & Politics
3,184
Reporters Without Orders Ep 27: WhatsApp, Assam and mob lynchings, media's Jio story and more
Newslaundry

The latest episode of Reporters Without Orders features our host Cherry Agarwal, along with Rohin Verma, Amit Bhardwaj and our special guest Abhishek Dey from Scroll.in. Kicking off the discussion, Amit says Jio got quite some coverage. “Jio is like any other telecom network in the country, why do you have to show it [as much] or give wall-to-wall coverage to whatever is happening during the launch? I think a small package or a couple of online stories would do, unless Jio is paying a lot of money.” Cherry adds, “In that case, they should have been putting a disclaimer, if it was about money in return for coverage.” Speaking about an event that was under-reported, Amit says, “Around 14,000 political activists and bandh supporters were on the streets and were detained by Jharkhand police. Majorly, none of the news channels gave it coverage during the day.” Abhishek speaks about the media's coverage of mob lynchings fuelled by WhatsApp rumours about child-lifters in Assam. “There are two things which are operating [contributing], primarily, one is the fear of the outsider, and the other would be technology. The victims in all these cases are outsiders.” Abhishek also speaks about how the idea of a child-lifter that was traditionally used to control the behaviour of children is now manifesting into a mob culture. "When we look into these kinds of things, we should always correlate them with development indices," he adds. “The solution should be designed in the context of the people which it is aimed for," comments Cherry. Rohin feels that lynching doesn’t seem to be an issue for the general public. “Jo humare regional akhbaar hai, unme iss tarah ki khabrein aa nahi rahi hain, aur bohot kam aa rahi hain, toh logon ke liye lynching koi bohot badi samasya nahi hai.” He adds, “WhatsApp ka iss tareekey ka prabhav hai ki padha-likha aadmi bhi apni padhai ko galat manta hai aur WhatsApp ko sahi manta hai. [The impact of WhatsApp is such that even educated people attach more value to WhatsApp over their own learning].” To which Cherry states, “I think it underlines the importance of making media literacy a part of school curriculum.” Rohin then speaks about a report that no one seems to be covering -- a story about the displacement of villagers of the Mahadalit community from Chamandih village in Bihar’s Gaya. The villagers were evicted from their land by Indian Railways. The story received no local coverage, save for a small piece in Dainik Jagran. For this and more, listen up!

News & Politics
2,276
The Awful and Awesome Entertainment Wrap Ep 78: Netflix's Sacred Games, advertisements and more
Newslaundry

This episode opens with a discussion on the 'No Scars cream' advertisement sent in by a listener. Rajyasree describes her experience of watching the advertisement as, “No Scars is a whitening cream, and darkness is like a scar. I just found it bizarre, and it’s so badly written, this ad.” Then, a chat about the government’s new PSA on mosquitoes. “Whoever’s made that ad either loves mosquitoes or hates children," says Abhinandan. Next, a discussion on Netflix’s first original Indian series, Sacred Games. “The production quality, the scripting, the acting, they’ve just nailed it," remarks Rajyasree. “There are very few things that one could say is wrong with this series," Abhinandan adds. On the use of voiceover and file footage as commentary for Indian pop culture of the time, Abhinandan remarks, “I think it works because it had political context, but sometimes, I felt it was a bit forced.”  Varun Grover, a co-writer of the show, joins the panel. On the source material, he says, “There are some characters we have removed from the book…because we wanted to focus on the religion and the thriller element, and the war of civilizations in a way.” Then, a glimpse into the writing process: “We started meeting in August 2016, and discussing the ideas, themes, and characters. After 3 months, we started fleshing out the thing into a major season arc. Third stage came in January 2017 when we started writing the episode outlines, putting together all the character arcs, and putting them under the POV of Sartaj or Gaintonde.” This was followed by a year of writing episodes. Grover also discusses working with the source material’s author. “Vikram Chandra has been very generous and open to new ideas. When we shared it with him the first time, he never asked us ‘why did you drop this’….he just accepted it and start giving ideas on how to improve it.” For more on this, RJs giving love advice, and the trailer of Fanney Khan, listen up!

Entertainment
3,250
एनएल चर्चा 28: आप-एलजी विवाद, खरीफ की कीमत, माब लिंचिंग व अन्य
Newslaundry

दिल्ली में तीन साल से चल रहे आप और एलजी के अधिकारों के विवाद पर आया सुप्रीम कोर्ट का फैसला, बच्चा चोरी के अफवाह पर देश भर में हो रही मॉब लिंचिग की घटनाएं, भारत में महिलाओं की असुरक्षा को लेकर आया थॉमसन रॉयटर्स का सर्वेक्षण, असम में चल रहे एनआरसी के आंकड़े और खरीफ की फसल पर बढ़ाया गया न्यूनतम समर्थन मूल्य व अन्य मुद्दे इस हफ्ते न्यूज़लॉन्ड्री चर्चा के मुख्य विषय रहे. एनडीटीवी की वरिष्ठ पत्रकार नग़मा सहर और स्वतंत्र पत्रकार मनीषा भल्ला इस बार की चर्चा के विशिष्ट अतिथि थे. उनके साथ पैनल में मौजूद थे न्यूज़लॉन्ड्री संवाददाता अमित भारद्वाज. न्यूज़लॉन्ड्री के कार्यकारी संपादक अतुल चौरसिया ने चर्चा का संचालन किया.

News & Politics
2,995
Chhota Hafta – Episode 179
Newslaundry

NL Hafta has gone behind the paywall, but we love our listeners. So, here's a little sneak peek into the complete episode where we discuss Supreme Court's verdict on the Kejriwal-LG standoff, NRC in Assam, WhatsApp rumours-triggered mob lynchings and more. You can listen to the full Hafta here (https://bit.ly/2ua2gdj)

News & Politics
2,052
Hafta 176: #UrbanNaxal, plot to kill the PM, Assam lynching and Atul Kochhar’s tweets
Newslaundry

In this episode of NL Hafta, our in-house team of Manisha Pande and Raman Kirpal is joined by two guest panelists -- Saikat Dutta, Asiatimes South Asia Editor and Saif Ullah Khan, Deputy Editor of DailyO. The discussion kicks off with the ‘plot to assassinate the PM’. Manisha asks Saikat, “Are there really ‘urban Naxals’ out there? What is the sense in this term?” Elaborating on the term, Saikat says, “If you look at Maoist literature...they have a lot of literature on urban warfare but they look at it from a military terminology, where they look at how to conduct urban operations, both, which will include psychological operations, information operations as well as military operations but they look at it from a very military perspective and that kind of literature is available.”   He further says, “Even the Naxals themselves or the Maoists have never talked about anything called ‘urban Maoist’ as a separate phenomenon because for them, class warfare is across -- whether rural or urban.” He adds, “This is a deliberate political term which some people of the Right have brought to discredit just about anybody who challenges their narrative.” Saif speaks of two writers, Arun Ferriera and Vernon Gonsalves, being arrested in 2007 on similar grounds. "Again, some letters were leaked and Arun was supposed to be, according to Maharashtra Police, one of the Communications experts. So he was arrested. And the trial went on for four years. And these leaked letters never even made it to the trial. So it was just about painting a certain narrative of a certain individual. Vernon was arrested in August 2007. And again, the trial went on for seven years. And he was supposed to be one of the people handling the finances of the Maoists.” He further adds, “Interestingly, there was a Narco analysis that was done on Arun Ferreira in which according to the leaks he had said it was the Shiv Sena and ABVP that had paid them...At that time it was the Congress and 2009 General Elections. Right now, you’re looking at 2019.” Raman says, “I think it was completely a plant! And 2019 elections, this was more for persecuting people rather than prosecuting.” Saikat says, “Here you have a plot allegedly to kill the Prime Minister, forget about the NIA, even the Central Bureau of Investigation has not been brought in.”  He adds, “Nobody’s talking about bringing in the Intelligence Bureau, nobody’s talking about bringing in the NIA or the CBI. That itself is a great indicator of what this plot is all about.” Manisha puts across a question to panelists on whether the ‘plot to kill Modi’ news makes up for a propaganda problem or a genuine lacuna in beat reporting. The discussion then proceeds to AAP’s protest against LG Anil Baijal. Saif assesses the situation from a political prism of how AAP perceives 2019 elections and its role in it. He says, “AAP is trying to use this ploy to gain some headline, to gain some sympathy in the run-up. It is very much a political thing they’re doing keeping 2019 in mind.” Saikat says, “Their first instinct is to become a victim and play that victim card and seek sympathy.” Expressing serious concern he says, “If the bureaucracy can cook a snook at an elected government with such an overwhelming majority, I think that’s dangerous for democracy. And it shows that the central government can go to any lengths to undermine the opposition.” Raman says that the BJP feared Kejriwal the most when he came in. “So they started building up a narrative around him that this man is chaotic,” he said. Listen up!

News & Politics
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#JustSports 86: 2018 FIFA World Cup special - Part 2
Newslaundry

Rahul Puri and Samar Khan discuss once again the vagaries of the ongoing FIFA World Cup 2018. Speaking from London, Rahul reflects upon how the underdogs have broken into the quarter-finals in this edition of the World Cup after vanquishing their stronger opponents through extraordinary football and athletic grit. He thinks that even though the big players are expected to make it into the advanced stages, “it is the other side of the draw that I think has got a lot of the mystery about it.”  Samar observes that World Cups differ because they demonstrate “defensive mindsets” across teams: “There is not the attacking, free-flowing football that we’re used to seeing -- the kind of football people pay to see. Teams are actually slugging it out.” Rahul says that even though that might be true for the first two rounds of the group stage, he points out that “the second round has been full of goals, I think the last stages of the group stage was also full of goals.”  The two discuss questions surrounding the Video Assistant Referee (VAR) again with Rahul confronting Samar’s criticism that the technology is obstructive to the flow of the game. He argues that it has affected teams, who no longer get away with foul play. However, he says, “My only problem with VAR is: what about the times when it doesn’t seem like a very consistent system?” The big players are discussed at length in the podcast with the duo remarking how each of them can clinch the much-coveted trophy. “If I was a betting man,” Rahul says “I’d probably put my semi-finals as France-Belgium and Croatia-England. And I’m looking at France-England final.” “Well, I am a betting man, so that’s where the money is,” Samar shoots back.

Sports
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Reporters Without Orders Ep 26: Media, Assam and NRC, PM Modi’s goof-up, women in newsrooms and more
Newslaundry

This episode of Reporters Without Orders has our in-house reporter Amit Bhardwaj joining our host Cherry Agrawal, along with special guests Vishakha Saxena from Asia Times and Arunabh Saikia from Scroll.in. The discussion kicks off with Cherry asking the participants to comment on the Supreme Court’s decision to extend the deadline to publish the National Register of Citizens (NRC) to July 30th. Arunabh comments on how the government is planning to establish the number of citizens in Assam and how it will affect them. “It’s a complicated process," he says, which necessitates one to “establish their connection to someone who was there before 1971...this could be anything from your father or grandfather’s name on a voter list before 1971.”  Speaking about the verification processes, Arunabh explains that the process is long, as different states need to send in their data in the case of migrants. “It’s clear to everyone in the state that this could be horrific…because currently illegal migrants are being held in detention camps.” Arunabh remarks that it is a “bleak future ahead”. Citing a report by The Hindu on the Citizen Amendment Bill, Cherry asks if this Bill is the method by which the “government is trying to change the definition of illegal migrants”. She also asks about the possible impact of the Bill, if passed, on the NRC list. Arunabh responds, “They are kind of changing who a foreigner is in India. If the Bill is enforced, then the NRC process becomes largely redundant…what it does is, it makes six years of a gigantic bureaucratic process largely redundant.” He also remarks that it is “essentially an anti-Muslim Bill.” The panel also discusses the local and national media's coverage of the NRC.   While Arunabh feels that the quantity of coverage was sufficient, he says that “the coverage could have been better” in terms of the quality. According to him, the issue of illegal migrants in Assam is an “immensely complex one. There are multiple academic interpretations." He adds,  "It is definitely xenophobic to a certain extent, but there was also an element of class struggle." Amit joins in. He asks Arunabh if there is a tendency to cover bizarre comments made by leaders instead of covering issues of governance and the “morally corrupt” appointment of officials, citing the Tripura governor’s recommendation of a BJP member to be appointed to the government. Arunabh agrees, he adds that there is much more to be covered in Tripura other than Biplab’s statements. Perhaps its harder to find these stories as “covering corruption requires the reporter to be underground, go through paperwork…it requires real digging which a lot of us find hard to do”, he adds. Now over to Vishakha, who feels that the June 26 Thomson Reuters survey which found that India was the most dangerous country for women was “quite under-reported and the reaction to it was also quite conflicting". Cherry disagrees, pointing to prime-time debates about the survey on news channels such as NewsX and CNN-News18. While there can be some contention about the methodology, because of the small sample size of 550 experts, the report should rather have been used as a trigger for a larger debate, Cherry says. “We don’t need any Thomson Reuters report or any UN report to realise what is happening in our country," comments Amit. Vishakha, Amit, and Arunabh also weigh in on gender equality in the newsroom. Then there are Amit's remarks about PM Modi’s recent goof-up in his speech in Maghar which was under-reported. There's more, listen up!

News & Politics
2,211
The Awful and Awesome Entertainment Wrap Ep 77: Sanju, Karan Johar's Dhadak, Soorma and more
Newslaundry

Abhinandan and Rajyasree discuss the latest biopic in town, Sanju, with Samar Khan from Mumbai. Khan, who is a former journalist, says, “It is a well-made film. It follows Rajkumar Hirani's theory, where he finds good in everything that is bad with the world." Rajyasree is not as much a fan of the film and says, “I thought the film was quite badly made. It is not a fictional film, considering all of Rajkumar’s films have been fictional films. This is a biopic, that has been promoted as a biopic. I understand if you present some facts, especially about a person you have worked with successfully, with a rose-tinted view. This entire thing about hoisting all responsibility of all of Sanjay Dutt’s actions on other people, he took drugs because of someone else who tricked him into it." In response to Rajyasree's comments, Abhinandan says, “In a biopic, you see shades of grey in everybody. However, in this case, he just came across as a caricature villain from a fictional film.” Talking about Anushka Sharma’s character, he says, “I don’t know if there is one such writer who starts crying every time Sanjay Dutt tells a story. It was a completely ridiculous character.” Sen also discusses the criticism of Karan Johar for trying to remake Sairat. “There has been a lot of criticism for Karan Johar because he is making this film called Dhadak, which is starring Sridevi’s daughter and Ishaan Khatar, and I could not understand why he is getting trashed because when I saw the trailer and then the promos and songs, it looks like a Karan Johar film.” Talking about the nature of biopics, Abhinandan says, “After you watch a biopic, it says based on true events, but the next line is that similarities are coincidental. I don’t understand that. If you are making a biopic, then every character and every event should be true in that. Now, there is this new convention that the central character will be real, the rest we’ll make shit up as we go along.” Talking about another film based on a real person, Rajyasree says, “Soorma is the story of this hockey player called Sandeep Singh who made a comeback after he gets shot and he’s put in a wheelchair and how he makes a comeback. I quite liked the trailer, and I quite liked Daljit Dosanjh." In response, Abhinandan says, “Daljit looks the part, but the thing that is of concern to me is the whole ‘based on true events’. That means that probably one event was true, but the rest will be nonsense. These are the kinds of things that piss me off. Either you say that the film is a figment of my imagination and I’ll enjoy it." Rajyasree also discusses Saheb, Biwi Aur Gangster 3 by saying, “Tigmanshu Dhulia is directing it for the third time. I felt the trailer was like the first two films. I can’t make out the difference. And Jimmy Shergill has to stop playing a villain. Even he has to be tired of it.” And then there’s the new biopic of Jaggi Vasudev which will be directed by Shashank Ghosh and produced by Rhea Kapoor, and of course, approved by Jaggi Vasudev’s Isha Foundation. Abhinandan closes by talking about an Everest Masala ad with Amitabh Bachchan. “It has this little boy and his mother…I thought that ad was really good.” There’s this and more. Listen up.

Entertainment
3,901
एनएल चर्चा 27 : वंदे मातरम, आपातकाल की वर्षगांठ, पत्थलगड़ी और अन्य
Newslaundry

भाजपा अध्यक्ष अमित शाह का वंदे मातरम को लेकर कांग्रेस पर तुष्टिकरण और बंटवारे का आरोप, आपातकाल की वर्षगांठ, मीडिया संस्थानों से नोटबंदी के दौरान एक सहकारिता बैंक (जिसके निदेशक अमित शाह थे) में पांच दिनों के अंदर 745 करोड़ रूपए जमा होने की खबर का हटाया जाना, झारखंड के खूंटी में पत्थलगड़ी आंदोलन, स्विस बैंकों में पैसे जमा होने की गति बढ़ना व अन्य मुद्दे इस हफ्ते न्यूज़लॉन्ड्री चर्चा के मुख्य विषय रहे. मीडिया विजिल के संस्थापक व वरिष्ठ पत्रकार पंकज श्रीवास्तव चर्चा के विशिष्ट अतिथि थे. उनके साथ पैनल में मौजूद थे न्यूज़लॉन्ड्री संवाददाता अमित भारद्वाज. न्यूज़लॉन्ड्री के कार्यकारी संपादक अतुल चौरसिया ने चर्चा का संचालन किया.

News & Politics
2,685
Hafta 175: Kashmir unrest, Bhima Koregaon arrests, Shimla water crisis, Al Jazeera sting
Newslaundry

In this episode of Hafta, the big question that the panel discusses is whether sting journalism is real journalism. BJP by poll losses and the violence that erupted in Shillong is also discussed. Al Jazeera's sting operation on match-fixing in cricket is another issue that engages the panel in a heated debate. The panel also discusses arrests made in connection with Bhima Koregaon violence and the water crisis in Shimla. The panel consists of Abhinandan Sekhri, Madhu Trehan, Manisha Pande, Anand Vardhan and our guest, NDTV's Sunetra Choudhury. BJP’s evident loss in the by poll is critically considered by the panel, when Abhinandan asks, “Is it something that needs the kind of coverage that it did? Is it any indication of who the people will vote for?” Madhu feels the 2019 elections are going to be the “dirtiest elections”. She suggests not to make much of these by polls and adds, “In politics, things can change on a dime." Sunetra Choudhury talks about the excitement built around the by poll results. She says, “We are looking at each and every by poll with bated breaths saying, ‘okay whats going to happen here’…interesting to see how people are getting involved’." Manisha agrees with Madhu and adds, “I wouldn’t read too much into by polls." Abhinandan moves onto the sting operation carried out by Al Jazeera to expose match-fixing in cricket. He says, “I lost interest in it." He wonders, “What was so great about this sting operation?” Anand, despite being a cricket fanatic agrees that the sting was “low on substance” and says it didn’t come up with a conclusive outcome. He, however, also feels that the sting had “good production values”. Madhu talks a little about the Cobrapost and Al Jazeera sting in relativity. She feels that the Cobrapost sting is “not journalistically correct”. Sunetra talks about the two Bengali newspapers that refused to engage with Acharya Atal (Cobrapost's undercover reporter) and how those organisations are a “benchmark” for journalism. The panel shifts their attention to the communal clashes between the Khasi tribe and the Punjabi settlers in Shillong. Known to many as the ‘musical town’, Sunetra shared her anecdotes from Shillong and tension that has spurred over the years. She adds, “I spent every summer there, for 21 years of my life, …curfews were very very common because of this kind of tension between various communities.” Manisha informs the panel of Shillong's long-standing history of tension. She says, “The first major riot was in 1979 by Khasi mobs directed at minorities." Abhinandan feels, “Northeast is a little more complicated because in any case they feel let down by the rest of India." Anand restrains his views and says, “Any tribe (from Shillong) can...say you don’t know much about our tribe.” The Ugly Indian Tourist, an article published by Open magazine is next on the panel's agenda. The article is discussed because Abhinandan feels it has created a lot of flutter. "I think it is an interesting article because I see both sides." The controversy is about the article having racist content. Moving on, the panel discussed the unrest in Kashmir. Manisha said that many [news organisation] have used the headline “mows down”, which she felt was problematic. She thought that in this case, the CRPF personnel in the vehicle had to just “negotiate its way through this violent". She says, "And you must also remember...some men were saying they were upset they could not pull him [the driver] out of the jeep," adding, "you must remember it was exactly a year ago that a policemen Ayub Pandith was lynched to death in the same area and his eyes were gouged out. It was a brutal gruesome lynching. I mean it is this kind of pressure that officers are operating under. Mob fury is very scary even if you have a gun. You have like 50 people approaching…I think it is really this situation where the driver was trying to negotiate through.”

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Chhota Hafta – Episode 178
Newslaundry

NL Hafta has gone behind the paywall, but we love our listeners. So, here's a little sneak peek into the complete episode where we discuss Saifuddin Soz's remarks, #Emergency, Vijay Mallya's letter to the Prime Minister and more. You can listen to the full Hafta here (https://www.newslaundry.com/2018/06/29/hafta-178-saifuddin-soz-emergency-vijay-mallyas-letter-to-the-prime-minister-and-more).

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Reporters Without Orders Ep 25: #HapurLynching, Jharkhand gangrape, Congress and the media
Newslaundry

This week Reporters Without Orders is celebrating its 25th episode. Our host Cherry Agarwal is joined by in-house reporter Amit Bhardwaj and Campus Politik editor Sumedha Pal, along with Sidhartha Dutta, Principal Correspondent, Indo-Asian News Service. The media coverage of Hapur lynching case is debated by the panel. Amit feels the “story developed slowly” but “got enough coverage”. He referred to the incident as “one of the slow-burn stories” that gain momentum in the media over a period of time. Cherry asks, “Why do you think this got coverage only after it developed to a certain stage?” Sidhartha talks about the incident being referred to as a case of road rage even though the evidence suggested otherwise. He adds, "I find it really alarming." Amit, following the meeting with the victim’s family, mentions the “the kind of horror they had gone through” and also shares other details of the incident. Sidhartha confesses, “Maybe so much of detail, I wouldn't have known had you not told me,” in support of his argument that the incident was not covered enough. Turning the conversation to another aspect of media criticism, Cherry asks, “We make comparisons to other events…do you think these comparisons are fair?” To which, Sumedha adds, “Such questions need a lot of self-reflection." Meanwhile, Amit impresses upon the prioritisation of stories in terms of media coverage. He says, “It depends upon news development on that particular day." As an agency reporter covering All India Congress Committee, Siddharth talks about Congress party’s relationship with the media. Sidhartha says, “It is imperative for reporters to always get the reaction of a principal Opposition party." Meaning to say that Congress' "position as the principal Opposition” is a probable reason for the party getting wider media coverage. Sumedha speaks about her report on sexual harassment allegations levelled against the NSUI national president by a former female party worker. She says, “Often stories of sexual harassment either end up becoming sensationalised or they are reduced to nothing." Amit says, “I am not drawing any conclusion about Fairoz Khan’s case”. He also mentions about the complexities of the case and the need for a thorough inspection into allegations. He also talks about media's possible reaction “had it been any ABVP member, from even a district member of the committee…Social media narrative would have been made by left-liberals,” he adds. For a third consecutive week, Amit says, stories from Jharkhand has been under-reported by the Big Media. For more details, listen up!

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