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#Science

  • #ICYMI - Space Jam: Basketball Cosmic Queries, with Neil deGrasse Tyson
    StarTalk Radio
    51:13
    Science
    181,619

    Neil deGrasse Tyson joins hosts Gary O’Reilly and Chuck Nice to answer fan submitted questions about the physics of basketball, Michael Jordan, and the impact of race on athletic performance. (Warning: Adult Language.) Don’t miss an episode of Playing with Science. Subscribe to our channels on: TuneIn: tunein.com/playingwithscience Apple Podcasts: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/playing-with-science/id1198280360 GooglePlay Music: https://play.google.com/music/listen?u=0#/ps/Iimke5bwpoh2nb25swchmw6kzjq SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/startalk_playing-with-science Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/startalk/playing-with-science NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free: https://www.startalkradio.net/all-access/space-jam-basketball-cosmic-queries-with-neil-degrasse-tyson/

  • 321 Les Allumettes
    Podcast Science
    01:12:10
    Science
    5,772

    Objet banal du quotidien s’il en est un, l’allumette ! Qui traine parfois encore au fond d’une poche ou d’un tiroir, bien qu’aujourd’hui fréquemment remplacé par le briquet... Qui prête encore vraiment attention à l’allumette ? Et bien Claire apparemment ! Dans ce dossier, elle compte nous rappeler que l’apparence si simple de cette dernière ne doit pas faire oublier son fantastique usage : permettre, d’un simple claquement de doigt ou presque, de produire du feu ! Son arrivée dans les chaumières, rendant ainsi le feu accessible à tous, a aussi été synonyme de beaucoup de confort. Quant à son invention, elle a été partie prenante d'une vraie révolution sociale. Alors l'allumette mérite bien qu'on raconte son histoire...

  • An over-the-counter drug that may help in the fight against MS
    UC Science Today
    01:03
    Science
    185

    Multiple Sclerosis, or MS, affects over two million people worldwide. The neurodegenerative disease strikes when the immune system attacks myelin, layers of a fatty insulating membrane that surround nerve fibers and help send nerve signals faster. Ari Green, a neurologist at the University of California, San Francisco, has found an over the counter allergy drug called Clemastine that could possibly help repair damaged myelin. “It was originally designed back in the 1970s as an antihistamine and we were excited that it showed the evidence that myelin repair is possible even with injury that is not immediate or acute, but has been there for some time." Green says because of possible side effects of the medication, Clemastine is only a prototype for a better myelin repairing drug that researchers have yet to develop. "What we want is a drug that has a very targeted effect that would be capable of inducing this repair without causing other side effects."

  • Wood Thrushes Countersinging
    Lang Elliott – Music of Nature
    06:35
    Nature Recording
    877

    Here is a lovely 6.5 minute soundscape that I just uncovered … two Wood Thrushes singing back-and-forth at dawn, recorded at Land Between the Lakes Kentucky way back in 1995, about the time I began gathering binaural soundscapes. I rather like it and think it’s a powerful reminder of things to come Yep, SPRING is just around the corner. Believe me! It’s a busy dawn chorus for sure, but if played at a medium to low sound level, it’s fairly gentle on the ears. The recording also features the incessant singing of distant Whip-poor-wills, Barred Owls hooting, Mourning Doves cooing, a woodpecker drumming (probably a Hairy Woodpecker), and plenty more species for the discerning ear.

  • 456 - Inside a Conservation NGO
    Science For The People
    01:00:00
    Science
    0

    This week we take a close look at conservation NGOS: what they do, how they work, and - most importantly - why we need them. We'll be speaking with Shyla Raghav, the Climate Change Lead at Conservation International, about using strategy and policy to tackle climate change. Then we'll speak with Rebecca Shaw, Lead Scientist at the World Wildlife Fund, about how and why you should get involved with conservation initiatives.

  • How exposure to PBDEs affect a child's IQ
    UC Science Today
    01:03
    Science
    185

    Exposure to flame retardant chemicals or PBDEs during pregnancy can affect children’s neurodevelopment. Environmental health scientist Tracey Woodruff of the University of California, San Francisco, found ten-fold increases in a mother's PBDE levels could lead to a drop of 3.7 IQ points in her child. While that may sound like a small number… "If you look at it over a population, it becomes very significant, because you have everybody exposed to PBDEs at a smaller risk. The small risk over a large population means that you can have a relatively large number of people who can have some type of effect." If this happens, the population level IQ could get shifted. This means there will be more people with an IQ score of about 70, which is considered a mentally-impaired category. “It can also decrease the number of people who are in the mentally-gifted categories." PBDEs can be found in many household items from furniture to toys to electronics. So, Woodruff says buying flame retardant-free products could make a big difference in your children’s health.

  • How To Improve Your Cybersecurity
    SciFri
    25:30
    Science
    1,397

    From password management to encrypted messaging to VPNs, tips on how to steer clear of getting hacked.

  • The SciFri Book Club: ‘Frankenstein’
    SciFri
    08:35
    Science
    1,378

    Mary Shelley’s classic science fiction horror story turns 200 this year—and it’s more relevant than ever to how we talk about science.

  • Mapping the great unknown of our brain
    UC Science Today
    01:02
    Science
    203

    Believe it or not, neuroscience is still considered a relatively new field of medical research. That’s because there’s still a lot of the unknown about our brain. For instance, how do brain cells wire up and function? To answer this question, John Ngai, a professor of molecular and cell biology at the University of California, Berkeley, is creating a brain catalogue or - as researchers call it – an atlas. “So the idea behind this brain atlas project is to identify all the cell types in the mouse brain as a model for understanding the human brain and then to understand their physiological properties, how they connect with other so this can be used as a basis for understanding not only normal function of the brain, but also how diseases might progress and eventually how you might treat those diseases in human neurological conditions." The effort is part of the federal government’s BRAIN Initiative, which launched four years ago. Its ultimate goal is to understand brain circuits well enough to devise new therapies for diseases of the human brain and nervous system.

  • Gravity Assist Podcast, Jupiter with Jared Espley
    NASA
    21:31
    Science
    1,369

    As large as 1,000 Earths, Jupiter is the heavy hitter of the solar system. Even its Great Red Spot is larger than Earth, yet it’s shrinking! In this episode of Gravity Assist, Planetary Science Director Jim Green talks with Jared Espley of NASA’s Juno mission about how Jupiter got to be so big, what may lie beneath Jupiter’s cloud tops, and its four remarkable and diverse Galilean moons—from icy Europa to volcanic Io. We’ll also hear eerie sounds around the giant planet from Juno’s Waves instrument.

  • A Temporary Relief For Tinnitus Sufferers
    SciFri
    15:58
    Science
    1,587

    A new way of thinking about hearing loss offers new opportunities for treatment.

  • Putting AI To Work For The Environment
    SciFri
    17:06
    Science
    1,130

    Lucas Joppa, chief environmental scientist at Microsoft, says that artificial intelligence has the potential to help answer big environmental questions.

  • Questioning AI: what are the key research challenges? – Science Weekly podcast
    Guardian Science Weekly
    35:25
    Science
    1,903

    In the first episode of our Questioning Artificial Intelligence mini-series, Ian Sample explores some of the key hurdles for machine learning, including reasoning and social intelligence

  • Could the progression of glaucoma be halted?
    UC Science Today
    01:03
    Science
    190

    Glaucoma is the world’s second-leading cause of blindness, and it affects about 80 million people worldwide and has no cure. But vision scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have discovered molecules that could probably halt the progression of the disease. Gronert: “We identified a novel factor, a new factor that potentially protects the optic nerve against damage, which is one of the underlying causes of glaucoma. That’s Karsten Gronert, a professor of optometry at UC Berkeley. He says, for decades, academic labs and pharmaceutical companies were trying to find treatment for glaucoma, but couldn’t show any promising results. This is probably because they were targeting the disease when it was already too late. "Once you have a degeneration of the optic nerve head, which is what causes glaucoma and eventually leads to blindness, that process is irreversible and cannot be stopped.” So Gronert and his colleagues took a different route. Instead of trying to fix what has been permanently damaged, they focused on prevention - protecting the mechanism that stops nerve degeneration.

  • Sorry, But Still No Aliens
    SciFri
    07:06
    Science
    1,106

    Plus: News of ancient migrations, strange dimensional physics, and the silliness of ‘raw water.’

  • How One Hospital Is Coping With A National IV Bag Shortage
    SciFri
    04:59
    Science
    1,002

    Hurricane Maria knocked out the Puerto Rican factory that produces a large amount of IV bags and fluids. How do hospitals adapt?

  • A Hair Closer To Lab-Grown (Mouse) Skin
    SciFri
    11:43
    Science
    990

    Skin is a complex organ that we still can’t grow completely in the lab. But one group got over a big hurdle: the humble hair follicle.

  • Life on Mars Mashup
    StarTalk Radio
    53:38
    Science
    254,201

    Ponder living on Mars in this Martian mashup as we explore “The Martian,” food and sports on Mars, and more. With Neil Tyson, Bill Nye, Mike Massimino, Buzz Aldrin, Andy Weir, Mary Roach, John Oliver, Eugene Mirman, Chuck Nice, Gary O’Reilly and many others. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://www.startalkradio.net/all-access/life-on-mars-mashup/

  • 320 Ethologie et empathie
    Podcast Science
    02:34:03
    5,532

    Le mercredi 29 novembre 2017, Agatha Liévin-Bazin est venu nous parler à nouveau d’éthologie et plus précisément d’émotions et d’empathie chez les animaux.  Encore aujourd’hui, le grand public a une vision assez violente et parfois négative du monde animal, souvent véhiculée par une formule attribuée (à tort) à Charles Darwin : « la survie du plus apte » (“the survival of the fittest” en réalité formulée par Herbert Spencer en 1864). On peut alors facilement imaginer une lutte âpre, sanglante et compétitive pour la survie laissant peu de place à l’altruisme et à l’entraide entre individus. Cependant, et Darwin s’y intéressait déjà en son temps, d’autres observations contredisent cette vision individualiste de la survie et suggèrent que les individus se préoccupent aussi du bien-être des autres et font preuve de « sympathie » ! Certains vont même jusqu’à se blesser gravement ou se mettre en danger de mort pour porter assistance à l’un de leur congénère. Un animal stressé transmet son état émotionnel à ses voisins proches et un animal serein, au contraire, va diminuer le stress ressenti par son compagnon inquiet. Comme chez l’humain, certains comportements liés à l’empathie seraient contagieux, et se transmettent d’un individu à l’autre, comme le bâillement. Il y aurait dans ces comportements une partie d’imitation et de similarité, qui activeraient les mêmes zones du cerveau entre celui qui baille et celui qui regarde l’autre bailler, le faisant bailler à son tour. On sait aussi que les chimpanzés, les corbeaux et les éléphants consolent un compagnon en détresse après un conflit et viennent l’enlacer. Tout ne serait donc pas que sauvagerie et égoïsme dans la lutte implacable pour la survie ?

  • Cassowary - Casuarius casuarius (Dad and Chicks)
    Nature Sounds
    04:16
    Nature Sounds
    1,218

    This was an amazing close range encounter allowing me to captured a male Cassowary feeding with his two chicks. The high pitched whistle is the sounds of the chicks the low frequency thumping sound is the call of the male Cassowary. This is a low res preview of the recording, if you are interested in the full recording please contact me. I hope you enjoy this recording! Copyright Tai Inoue at Nature Sounds 2017

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