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#Learning

  • Brollies and Bumbershoots (Full Episode)
    A Way with Words
    51:00
    Learning
    359

    If you think they refer to umbrellas as bumbershoots in the UK, think again. The word bumbershoot actually originated in the United States! In Britain, it's a brolly. Plus, a man who works a ski resort shares the vocabulary he and coworkers use to describe grooming the snow. And there's more than one way to pronounce the name of the bread that you pile with lox and cream cheese. Also: strong like bull, whistle britches, long suit and strong suit, homey and homely, wet behind the ears, and dead nuts. http://waywordradio.org

  • Deutsch lernen (B2/C1) | Langsam gesprochene Nachrichten vom 19.04.2018
    DW - Learn German
    07:19
    Deutsch lernen
    316

    Klickt hier, um zum Manuskript zu gelangen: http://bit.ly/Deutschlernen_Langsam-gesprochene-Nachrichten_19042018 Täglich von Montag bis Samstag findet ihr hier aktuelle Tagesnachrichten der DW – langsam und verständlich gesprochen. Neben der Audio-Datei gibt es auch den vollständigen Text zum Mitlesen. Hier geht's zur Übersichtsseite: dw.com/langsamenachrichten

  • Deutsch lernen (B2) | Der Pfiffikus
    DW - Learn German
    01:37
    Deutsch lernen
    218

    Um jemanden zu bauchpinseln, braucht man keine Farbe, Extrawürste kann man nicht essen und Rabenmütter sind keine Vögel. Warum das so ist, erfahrt ihr hier. Jede Woche stellen wir euch ein ein kurioses deutsches Wort vor – in unserem „Wort der Woche“. Klickt hier für mehr kuriose Wörter: dw.com/wortderwoche

  • Antonin Scalia
    YaleUniversity
    27:24
    92

    A hero to the right, a foe to the left, Antonin Scalia was one of the most influential Supreme Court justices to ever serve. Richard Hasen discusses Scalia's legacy.

  • EP 627 Let Passion Lead
    Lewis Howes
    05:20
    Learning
    0

    Look for something to be grateful for every day. Check out the video, show notes, and more at http://www.LewisHowes.com/627

  • College Students and Mental Health: Confronting an Emerging Crisis
    Harvard University
    59:06
    171

    Mental health issues are alarmingly on the rise among college students, and a serious gap exists in campus services to help them. What can be done to meet this growing need, spurred by issues of anxiety and depression, that has been described as sudden and dramatic by the Center for Collegiate Mental Health? In a spring 2017 survey by the American College Health Association, 39 percent of college students reported feeling so depressed that they were having trouble functioning, and 61 percent said that they had overwhelming anxiety in the previous 12 months. This Forum served as a call to action, asking how to develop a campus culture that prioritizes the prevention of mental health issues and the destigmatization of existing conditions. An expert panel featured leaders from academia, mental health advocacy and psychology, who spoke from a public health and health care delivery perspective. How do we support students in need; remove barriers, particularly for already marginalized students; boost communication; and promote wellness drivers, such as improved sleep, nutrition, exercise and social connectedness? And how do we gather the much-needed evidence for public health policies? Part of The Dr. Lawrence H. and Roberta Cohn Forums, this event was presented jointly with HuffPost on Tuesday, April 17, 2018.

  • Deutsch lernen (B2/C1) | Langsam gesprochene Nachrichten vom 20.04.2018
    DW - Learn German
    06:39
    Deutsch lernen
    190

    Klickt hier, um zum Manuskript zu gelangen: http://bit.ly/Deutschlernen_Langsam-gesprochene-Nachrichten_20042018 Täglich von Montag bis Samstag findet ihr hier aktuelle Tagesnachrichten der DW – langsam und verständlich gesprochen. Neben der Audio-Datei gibt es auch den vollständigen Text zum Mitlesen. Hier geht's zur Übersichtsseite: dw.com/langsamenachrichten

  • "Lysistrata" w/ Lucy Lawless, Emily Perkins, Erica Spyres, Bill Youmans & Aaron Gleason
    Partially Examined Life
    01:22:32
    Entertainment
    212

    The PEL Players return to perform Aristophanes's comedy (first performed in 411 BCE) about using a sex strike to stop war, using Jeffrey Henderson's 1988 translation. Mark (old men's chorus leader), Wes (old men's chorus and Athenian), Dylan (old men's chorus), and Seth (Spartan sentry) are joined once again by TV's Lucy Lawless (Xena Warrior Princess, Ash vs. Evil Dead, Spartacus, Battlestar Galactica, etc.) as Lysistrata and Broadway's Bill Youmans (hear his past performance for us of Crito) as the Athenian magistrate and Athenian ambassador. Plus, new fan Emily Perkins (she was the girl in the TV mini-series of Stephen King's It and starred in the Ginger Snaps movies) as the young Athenian wife Myrrhine as well as the Spartan Lampito and several other small old- and young-woman parts. (The young women are holding the sex strike while the old women have taken over the treasury in the Citadel of Athena to stop funds from going to the war.) Bill brought along his fellow cast member in the current Broadway production of Carousel, Erica Spyres, to play Lysistrata's co-conspirator Calonice, the old women's chorus leader, and other parts. Finally, actor/musician Aaron David Gleason (also featured on the Nakedly Examined Music podcast, episode 71) joined in to play the young Athenian soldier Rodney Balling (husband of Myrrhine) as well as the Spartan ambassador (who sings!) and joined the old man's chorus. We start out by giving a bit of historical context and explaining some of the weird conventions of the play, then give a "cold read" of the full script (meaning this was not rehearsed, though the result has been edited to smooth things out and add some sound effects and a little music), then talk for another ten minutes after we're done about what we just read. Is this the feminist tract that history presents it as? This was performed via remote conference call. Each participant recorded him- or herself locally, which explains the difference in sound quality among participants, but I've done my best to smooth everything out. The giggling and a few actual scene-breaking comments were carefully left in, though, to help convey how damn fun this was. Henderson's translation uses a modern idiom (so this doesn't sound like Shakespeare, which would be just as remote from the original Greek as what you're hearing here), and presents the Spartan foreigners as having Russian accents. We'll be releasing as Partially Examined Life episode 188 a full discussion of the play, bringing back Lucy and Emily as guests to help us work out the relation between feminine power (and sex) and politics both for the Ancient Greeks and for us now. What does it really mean to say "make love not war," and does the increasing presence of female political leaders portend any changes of the sort that Charlotte Perkins Gilman predicted? We're pleased to bring you this performance without commercial interruptions. Why not respond in loving kind by tipping some pennies into the hat? If you enjoy this, check out our past PEL Players productions: Antigone (feat. Lucy Lawless and Paul Provenza), No Exit (feat. Lucy and Jaime Murray), and (if you're desperate) Plato's Gorgias (feat. no real actors whatsoever). Lysistrata image by Solomon Grundy. You can still get our 2017 wall calendar of his art at partiallyexaminedlife.com/calendar.

  • Lessons from the Democratic Transition in Mongolia: 25 Years After Revolution | AshCast
    Harvard University
    01:10:47
    247

    On Thursday, March 8th, the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation hosted a Democracy in Hard Places Initiative seminar titled, “Lessons from the Democratic Transition in Mongolia: 25 Years After Revolution.” The talk featured Jargal DeFacto, economist and media personality. Mark Elliott, Vice Provost of International Affairs at Harvard University and the Mark Schwartz Professor of Chinese and Inner Asian History, moderated. Anthony Saich, Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation Director and Daewoo Professor of International Affairs, provided an introduction.

  • 2001: How to create your IRRESISTIBLE offer with Lisa Sasevich (An Audio Masterclass)
    EOFire
    55:52
    262

    Visit EOFire.com for complete show notes of every Podcast episode. Sponsors: Klaviyo: Klaviyo helps eCommerce marketers save time and make more money through super- targeted, highly relevant email and advertising campaigns. That's why thousands of ecommerce companies use Klaviyo to increase their sales! And right now, you can sign up for free!

  • Cultural Studies and the Challenge of Inequality Today [Audio]
    LSE Podcasts
    01:34:43
    News & Politics
    179

    Speaker(s): Professor Tony Bennett, Professor Angela McRobbie, Dr Clive James Nwonka, Professor Beverley Skeggs | This event will consider the prospects for contemporary thinking within the cultural studies tradition to engage with current inequalities. Mindful of the historical importance of this tradition, dating back to the 1960s and including work by Richard Hoggart, Raymond Williams, Stuart Hall, feminist cultural theory, and Bourdieu, the panel will both take stock of these older perspectives and offer their thoughts on contemporary prospects. Tony Bennett is Research Professor in Social and Cultural Theory in the Institute for Culture and Society at Western Sydney University. Angela McRobbie is Professor of Communications at Goldsmiths University of London. She has recently elected Fellow of the British Academy. Her early work was carried out at Birmingham Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies and her most recent books include: The Aftermath of Feminism 2008, Be Creative 2015. She is currently completing Feminism, Neoliberalism and Popular Culture (Polity 2019). Clive James Nwonka (@CJNwonka) is Course Leader for the Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity, LSE. His research is interested in how inequality is visualised and framed in cinema and cultural policy, through both film studies and cultural studies approaches. Beverley Skeggs (@bevskeggs) is Academic Director for the Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity, LSE. Bev is one of the foremost feminist sociologists in the world, her work has been significant in drawing attention to the intersections between class and gender inequality. Mike Savage (@MikeSav47032563) is Martin White Professor of Sociology at LSE and co-Director of LSE International Inequalities Institute. The International Inequalities Institute at LSE (@LSEInequalities) brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead critical and cutting edge research to understand why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.

  • Deutsch lernen (C1/C2) | Das PASCH-Netzwerk – ein Erfolgsmodell
    DW - Learn German
    10:58
    Deutsch lernen
    352

    Testet euer Wissen mit interaktiven Übungen: http://bit.ly/Alltagsdeutsch_Das-PASCH-Netzwerk-ein-Erfolgsmodell Unter dem Titel ALLTAGSDEUTSCH findet ihr Audiobeiträge zu bunten Themen aus dem deutschen Alltag. Zusätzlich könnt ihr das Manuskript und die Übungen zum Beitrag ausdrucken. Hier geht's zur Übersichtsseite: dw.com/alltagsdeutsch

  • Britteney Black Rose Kapri vs. Black Queer Hoetics
    The Poetry Foundation
    59:17
    119

    Britteney Black Rose Kapri joins Danez and Franny for a hoot of a podcast, in which the squad breaks down Hoe Poetics, the joys and challenges of mentorship, and much, much more. Britteney’s upcoming book Black Queer Hoe, featuring a foreword by Danez, is dropping September 4th, and is available for preorder now.

  • Deutsch lernen (B2/C1) | Langsam gesprochene Nachrichten vom 17.04.2018
    DW - Learn German
    08:46
    Deutsch lernen
    334

    Klickt hier, um zum Manuskript zu gelangen: http://bit.ly/Deutschlernen_Langsam-gesprochene-Nachrichten_17042018 Täglich von Montag bis Samstag findet ihr hier aktuelle Tagesnachrichten der DW – langsam und verständlich gesprochen. Neben der Audio-Datei gibt es auch den vollständigen Text zum Mitlesen. Hier geht's zur Übersichtsseite: dw.com/langsamenachrichten

  • Angela Duckworth Says Grit Is Not Enough
    EdSurge On Air
    13:38
    Learning
    566

    Angela Duckworth’s research on encouraging “grit” in students has been hailed as groundbreaking, popularized in bestselling books and TED talks. It has also been called racist, and some have criticized the work for essentially blaming students for their circumstances. Duckworth has faced the backlash by practicing a bit of grit herself. Take her reaction when a PhD candidate emailed her explaining that he was doing his dissertation about how the grit narrative ignored systemic barriers that may keep some students from persisting, no matter their character. She offered to serve on the student’s dissertation committee, to gain a deeper understanding of his criticisms. EdSurge sat down with Duckworth this week just after her keynote at the ASU+GSV Summit in San Diego, to talk about her work and what’s next for the nonprofit she created to translate her research into advice for teachers.

  • Privacy as a human right
    Harvard University
    18:02
    71

    The recent scandal over Facebook’s use of personal information has shone fresh light on one of the most pressing issues of the 21st century: How can we protect our privacy when we are willingly—or unwillingly—giving vast amounts of data to companies like Facebook, Google, or Amazon. But those technology companies aren’t the only ones using personal information. This kind of data is also at the core of the work of international agencies delivering humanitarian aid. In this week’s episode we speak with Dan Scarnecchia, a researcher with the Signal Program on Human Security and Technology based at the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative. Scarnecchia and his colleagues recently wrote the Signal Code, which represents a human rights approach to privacy and data during crises. We’ll examine how the humanitarian field is now grappling with ever-changing technology and increasing reliance on data and personal information.

  • Dr Michael Parker - The top ten ways to die in space
    University of Cambridge
    53:05
    Learning
    82

    A fact that scientists rarely mention is that space really, really wants to murder you. While this is upsetting, it does at least want to kill you in interesting ways! Dr Michael Parker explains his personal top ten most exciting ways that space can obliterate tiny, fragile humans. Dr Michael Parker grew up in the Lake District, did his undergraduate degree in theoretical physics in Durham, then a PhD in astronomy in Cambridge. He worked as a postdoc in Cambridge for 18 months, now he's an ESA research fellow, based at the European Space Astronomy Centre (ESAC) in Madrid.

  • How To Practice Peace
    San Francisco Zen Center
    37:18
    52

    04/04/2018, Myogan Djinn Gallagher, dharma talk at City Center.

  • S11E04: Svenska akademien special
    Juridikpodden
    45:25
    286

    Massa rättsliga frågor med anledning av krisen i Svenska akademien! Är det olagligt att läcka nobelpriset? Man sitter på livstid - är det ändå möjligt att sluta som ledamot i akademien? Vad är egentligen Svenska akademiens juridiska status? Vad innebär ledamöternas "tystnadsplikt"? Och självaste kungen är beskyddare - vad innebär det egentligen? Tack våra sponsorer: Delphi, Lindahl, Vinge och G&D!

  • Kamrooz Aram, Matthew Angelo Harrison
    Modern Art Notes Podcast
    57:15
    podcast
    0

    Artists Kamrooz Aram, Matthew Angelo Harrison.

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