Top tracks on Soundclound

#Science

  • S3E20-Telepathy
    Flash Forward
    49:58
    Science
    148

    In our last episode of the season, we take one one of the most requested futures: telepathy! What would it be like to be able to link minds, and communicate brain to brain? And how likely is it that we’ll ever get this kind of technology?

  • Golden Record: Amoy (Min Dialect)Greeting
    NASA
    00:07
    NASA
    452,134

    This is a greeting to the universe that was electronically placed on the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft. English Translation: "Friends of space, how are you all? Have you eaten yet? Come visit us if you have time."

  • Soundscape : Huon Peninsula, Papua New Guinea
    Listening Earth
    39:13
    Natural soundscape
    144

    This is an edit of recordings from the highland rainforests of the Huon Peninsula in Papua New Guinea. These recordings were made during a recent trip to PNG with several colleagues from the Australian Wildlife Sound Recording Group. This edit contains some highlights from the four weeks we spent trekking and recording in the mountain forests above 2000m. In the near future I'll be making these recordings available in full, but for now, this is some of what we encountered.

  • Frozen Soil Still Teems With Life
    SciFri
    16:41
    Science
    814

    Microbes and root systems create a cozy ecosystem amid the icy earth.

  • Quindar: Sound #1
    NASA
    00:24
    nasa
    655,496
  • Cosmic Queries Astrophysics Mashup
    StarTalk Radio
    55:34
    Science
    313,042

    Delve into this mashup of Cosmic Queries as Neil deGrasse Tyson and an ensemble of comic co-hosts explore the vast wonder of the cosmos including double star systems, black holes, dark matter and antimatter, the Hubble constant, tidal friction, ET, and much more. NOTE: StarTalk All-Access subscribers can listen to this entire episode commercial-free: https://www.startalkradio.net/all-access/cosmic-queries-astrophysics-mashup/

  • 321 Les Allumettes
    Podcast Science
    01:12:10
    Science
    5,772

    Objet banal du quotidien s’il en est un, l’allumette ! Qui traine parfois encore au fond d’une poche ou d’un tiroir, bien qu’aujourd’hui fréquemment remplacé par le briquet... Qui prête encore vraiment attention à l’allumette ? Et bien Claire apparemment ! Dans ce dossier, elle compte nous rappeler que l’apparence si simple de cette dernière ne doit pas faire oublier son fantastique usage : permettre, d’un simple claquement de doigt ou presque, de produire du feu ! Son arrivée dans les chaumières, rendant ainsi le feu accessible à tous, a aussi été synonyme de beaucoup de confort. Quant à son invention, elle a été partie prenante d'une vraie révolution sociale. Alors l'allumette mérite bien qu'on raconte son histoire...

  • Putting AI To Work For The Environment
    SciFri
    17:06
    Science
    1,130

    Lucas Joppa, chief environmental scientist at Microsoft, says that artificial intelligence has the potential to help answer big environmental questions.

  • Golden Record: Kiss, Mother And Child
    NASA
    00:24
    NASA
    419,059

    This is a sound that was electronically placed onboard the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft.

  • NASA In Silicon Valley Introduction
    NASA
    03:02
    Science
    13,730

    NASA in Silicon Valley podcast gives an in depth look at the various researchers, scientists, engineers, and all around cool people who work at NASA to push the boundaries of innovation. Transcript at http://www.nasa.gov/ames/nisv-podcast-introduction

  • Space Habitat
    NASA
    56:04
    Science
    2,220

    Episode 24 features Lisa Spence, Flight Analogs Project Manager, and Dr. Paul Haugen, HERA Operations Engineer, who talk about the space habitat analog here in Texas. They discuss what it's like inside, what crewmembers do on missions, and how to sign up to participate in the study. This episode was recorded on November 16, 2017.

  • Golden Record: English Greeting
    NASA
    00:04
    NASA
    289,289

    This is a greeting to the universe that was electronically placed on the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft. English Translation: "Hello from the children of planet Earth."

  • Quindar: Sound #2
    NASA
    00:24
    nasa
    456,549
  • Golden Record: Arabic Greeting
    NASA
    00:06
    NASA
    402,012

    This is a greeting to the universe that was electronically placed on the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft. English Translation: "Greetings to our friends in the stars. We wish that we will meet you someday."

  • Gravity Assist Podcast, The Moon with Sarah Noble
    NASA
    21:51
    Science
    2,021

    Did you know the Moon is slowly moving away from Earth and that the Moon has water? Jim Green is joined by lunar expert Sarah Noble to discuss how the Moon was formed, lava tubes and moonquakes, the “dark side of the Moon,” and mysteries we have yet to solve about Earth’s nearest neighbor.

  • Early Satellite Communications: Project Relay
    NASA
    08:18
    Science
    17,815

    A recording recently rediscovered in the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory audio archives comes from Project Relay, an early satellite communications project. Relay, managed by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, involved an “active” satellite that received and retransmitted signals on a different frequency. In this audio file from Jan. 29, 1963, Jack James, manager of the Mariner program exploring the inner solar system at JPL, speaks with John Glenn, who was then providing astronaut input into the new Apollo program.

  • International Space Station siren
    European Space Agency
    00:32
    esa
    104,809

    Ever wonder how the International Space Station alarms sounds? This emergency alert is the last thing astronauts on the ISS ever want to hear as they work 400 km above Earth in the vacuum of space. This sound was sent to us by the Columbus Control Centre, near München, Germany, the operations centre for ESA astronauts and the Columbus laboratory, part of the orbiting weightless research centre. The alarm is sounded on the International Space Station to alert astronauts to life-threatening emergencies such as loss of pressure or fire. The astronauts would immediately convene near their Soyuz spacecraft that serve as lifeboats, but these kind of emergencies are extremely rare and the alarm has sounded only a handful of times despite the Space Station having been inhabited since 2000. Most astronauts on a six-month space flight will only ever hear the sound during a practice session. Regular 'fire-drills' are performed to make sure that even in a worst-case scenario everybody knows what to do. Mission controllers from the international partners that run the Space Station in Russia, USA, Europe and Japan re-enact scenarios with the astronauts in space. In critical situations the teams on ground need to communicate efficiently, act quickly and coordinate a solution between each other and the astronauts flying 400 km above them. Image credit: ESA/NASA Audio credit: ESA, CC BY-SA IGO 3.0 http://www.esa.int/Services/Creative_Commons_Attribution-ShareAlike_3.0_IGO_CC_BY-SA_3.0_IGO_Licence https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/igo/

  • Apollo 13: Houston, We've Had a Problem
    NASA
    00:17
    nasa
    320,474
  • Strangler Fig Tree - Fruiting
    Nature Sounds
    01:28
    Nature Sounds
    55,745

    The sounds of a large Strangler Fig Tree fruiting in the Wet Tropics of Queensland.

  • SLS Test Fire
    NASA
    00:23
    nasa
    558,044
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