Top tracks on Soundclound

#Learning

  • ENVP, Tracy Little Schuetz "Earn AIT & Close 2017 Strong"
    ENVP, Donna Johnson
    25:42
    1,815

    spoken training

  • [ Ep. 5 - Iyagi Beginner - Ideal Type ]
    TalkToMeInKorean
    04:23
    802
  • TTMIK Level 1 Lesson 3 - Good-bye, See you
    TalkToMeInKorean
    07:22
    Education
    201,831

    Start learning Korean today with TalkToMeInKorean's easy-to-follow audio lessons. The lessons are also accompanied by PDF lesson notes at http://talktomeinkorean.com

  • Debussy: Arabesque No.1 in E major (Ryo Fukaura, University College London)
    UCL Sound
    04:02
    Classical
    201,851

    Claude Debussy (1862-1918) - Arabesque No.1 in E major (c.1891) Piano - Ryo Fukaura Listen to more from UCL's Chamber Music Club here: https://soundcloud.com/uclsound/sets/ucl-chamber-music-club UCL is consistently ranked as one of the world's top universities. Across all disciplines our faculties are known for their research-intensive approaches, academic excellence and engagement with global challenges. This is the basis of our world-renowned degree programmes. Visit us at www.ucl.ac.uk.

  • Transform FEAR into TRUST
    davidji
    15:16
    fear
    57,518

    Like what you hear? Check out davidji's guided meditation albums on: iTunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/davidji/id347046137 Amazon http://amzn.to/2bax4Rr Google Play https://play.google.com/store/music/artist/Davidji?id=A7wlrwh3hqs3xggejot2uvxsuha&hl=en

  • TTMIK Level 1 Lesson 5 - It's me, What is it?
    TalkToMeInKorean
    11:19
    Education
    186,193

    Start learning Korean today with TalkToMeInKorean's easy-to-follow audio lessons. The lessons are also accompanied by PDF lesson notes at http://talktomeinkorean.com

  • Total Relaxation Guided Meditation (remix)
    davidji
    14:29
    relaxation
    48,819

    Photo Credit: carlobaldino via Compfight cc Like what you hear? Check out davidji's guided meditation albums on: iTunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/davidji/id347046137 Amazon http://amzn.to/2bax4Rr Google Play https://play.google.com/store/music/artist/Davidji?id=A7wlrwh3hqs3xggejot2uvxsuha&hl=en

  • Deutsch lernen (B1) | Schlechte Luft in Großstädten
    DW - Learn German
    03:04
    Deutsch lernen
    12,033

    Testet euer Wissen mit interaktiven Übungen: http://bit.ly/Top-Thema_Schlechte-Luft-in-Großstädten Mit dem Top-Thema könnt ihr euch gleichzeitig über Neues aus aller Welt informieren und euren Wortschatz erweitern. Wir bieten euch zwei leicht verständliche Berichte mit Vokabelangaben und Fragen zum Text pro Woche. Hier geht's zur Übersichtsseite: dw.com/topthema

  • LSE IQ Episode 10 | What makes a great leader?
    LSE Podcasts
    37:08
    News & Politics
    871

    To subscribe on Apple podcasts please visit http://apple.co/2r40QPA or on Andriod http://subscribeonandroid.com/www.lse.ac.uk/assets/richmedia/webFeeds/lseiqpodcast_iTunesStore.xml or search for 'LSE IQ' in your favourite podcast app or visit http://lse.ac.uk/iq Welcome to LSE IQ, a monthly podcast from the London School of Economics and Political Science, where we ask leading social scientists - and other experts - to answer an intelligent question about economics, politics or society. If you do a quick Amazon search on ‘leadership books’ and you’ll get nearly 200,000 results. These books promise to reveal the leadership secrets of luminaries such as Steve Jobs, notable explorers, military figures, and numerous sports men and women. Whether we’re seeking to improve our own ability to lead or wondering why those around us aren't better at it, there’s plenty of advice out there. In this episode of LSE IQ, Sue Windebank looks at the research and asks, 'What makes a great leader?' This episode features: Dr Connson Locke, Senior Lecturer in Practice, LSE Department of Management; Professor Elizabeth Samet, Department of English & Philosophy, US Military Academy, West Point and; Professor Ben Voyer, Visiting Fellow, LSE’s Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science. For further information about the podcast and all the related links visit http://lse.ac.uk/iq and please tell us what you think using the hashtag #LSEIQ.

  • The Rich Roll Podcast: Best Of 2017 Part II
    Rich Roll Podcast
    02:29:24
    Learning
    83,798

    FULL BLOG & SHOW NOTES: bit.ly/richroll338 The Plantpower Meal Planner: meals.richroll.com

  • More James's Psychology: Self and Will (Part Two)
    Partially Examined Life
    01:16:51
    Learning
    394

    Concluding on William James's Psychology, the Briefer Course (1892). We briefly cover emotions and spend the bulk of our time on will. Talking about emotions allows us to refresh on James's overall theory of mind: An organism's activity basically involves various signals coming in through the senses and going out to produce reaction. This chain can reach to a greater or lesser extent into consciousness: from a reflex (mindless) action at one extreme, which might be or simply start as an instinct, or might have once been a choice but then became a habit. An emotion is a physiological reaction that we then notice; this feeling of the physical change is the emotion. Attention (accompanied by memory) is the faculty that filters the confusion of the stream of experience into identifiable things. A voluntary action is one taken with a memory that such an action can be done (so it must have been done the first time by instinct, reflex, or chance) with a plan to produce the same effect. This gives a partial picture of what "will" amounts to. It's not a single faculty, but a combination of different phenomena, mostly related to attention. You could consider every voluntary action to be "willed," but many such actions don't hold our attention more than a moment or are part of a habitual chain, such that they don't actually attract our attention unless something goes wrong. I might be thirsty and reach for the water in front of me while concentrating on something else. Did I "will" the action? Well, the only times we generally use that term is when there's some difficulty in the decision or the action: I reach for the water, but I'm very tired and have to overcome my tiredness to reach for it, as if the obstacle is saying "are you sure?" Or maybe the drink is whisky and I stop to think whether I’ve already had too much. In short, these input-output chains can conflict, which then brings attention to bear, and when we do make a decision, that’s where the explicit “fiat” that we typically call “will” comes in (even though many more actions are voluntary and hence willed as opposed to against-your-will). James thinks that whichever idea is held in attention the longest tends to have causal efficacy. If my desire for the alcohol is great, then repeated acts of attention would be required to pull myself back from that desire and consider the idea that enough is enough. Insofar as we have to exert this kind of effort, that really feels like will. With this picture established, we spend some time bickering about James’s stance regarding free will. He explicitly says that he’s not going to deal with that in this essay, that we can still talk about moral psychology with just the facts of temptation and effort as described above, and we can judge someone’s virtue from their apparent capacity to summon up such effort. As a scientist, James says that he’s committed to the idea that all actions have a physiological cause, yet he can distinguish phenomenologically between actions that seem like involuntary, reflex actions from ones that seem deliberative and voluntary. But are we really, metaphysically, free? The scientist must remain silent on this point, as metaphysics is outside the scope of science.

  • Validation Fever | Heart Science.
    Good Life Project
    20:23
    0

    Asking for advice, but secretly seeking validation? You're not alone. Here's what to do about it. And, in science news, an exercise that reverses heart disease. If you enjoyed this episode check out show notes and more at http://www.goodlifeproject.com/validation-fever/

  • #107 — Is Life Actually Worth Living?
    Waking Up with Sam Harris
    01:56:25
    39,328

    In this episode of the Waking Up podcast, Sam Harris speaks with David Benatar about his philosophy of “anti-natalism." They discuss the asymmetry between the good and bad things in life, the ethics of existential risk, the moral landscape, the limits and paradoxes of introspection, the “experience machine” thought experiment, population ethics, and other topics. You can support the Waking Up podcast at SamHarris.org/support.

  • What is modern slavery? (30 Oct 2012)
    UCL Sound
    36:37
    Education Lecture
    1,664

    Lunch Hour Lecture - Autumn 2012 Dr Virginia Mantouvalou, UCL Laws Is slavery confined to the past? Sadly not. Instances of grave labour exploitation exist in present-day Europe and elsewhere. This lecture will discuss abuses of labour conditions suffered by domestic workers, victims of trafficking and others. It will explain why their situation is akin to slavery, and will set out the steps that have been taken in law to protect the human rights of these workers. UCL is consistently ranked as one of the world's top universities. Across all disciplines our faculties are known for their research-intensive approaches, academic excellence and engagement with global challenges. This is the basis of our world-renowned degree programmes. Visit us at www.ucl.ac.uk.

  • The Cold War: a world history [Audio]
    LSE Podcasts
    01:21:50
    News & Politics
    737

    Speaker(s): Professor Arne Westad | Arne Westad and Michael Cox discuss the truly global nature of the Cold War, with East and West demanding absolute allegiance around the world. For over forty years the demands of the Cold War shaped the lives of millions of people worldwide, with countries as remote from each other as Korea, Angola, and Cuba defined by the conflict. For many nations, the war was not 'cold' at all and the second half of the 20th century offered no reprieve from horrors of world war. This conversation is based on Professor Westad's new book, The Cold War: A World History. Arne Westad (@OAWestad) is the S.T. Lee Professor of US-Asia Relations at Harvard University. Michael Cox is Director of LSE IDEAS and Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it.

  • Sam Harris on the Science of Good and Evil
    Intelligence Squared
    01:22:51
    Learning
    0

    Where do our ideas about morality and meaning come from? Most people - from religious extremists to secular scientists - would agree on one point: that science has nothing to say on the subject of human values. Indeed, science's failure to explain meaning and morality has become the primary justification for religious faith and the reason why even many non-believers feel obliged to accord respect to the beliefs of the devout. In this podcast, recorded at our event in April 2011, Sam Harris, the American philosopher and neuroscientist, argues that these views are mistaken - that amidst all the competing arguments about how we should lead our lives, science can show us that there are right and wrong answers. This means that moral relativism is mistaken and that there can be neither a Christian nor a Muslim morality - and that ultimately science can and should determine how best to live our lives. After an opening speech, Revd Dr Giles Fraser, former-canon chancellor of St Paul's Cathedral, joins Harris in conversation.

  • EP 109 7 Simple Steps to Master the Game of Money with Tony Robbins
    Lewis Howes
    52:44
    podcast
    0

    "It's time to become the chess player, not the chess piece." - Tony Robbins If you enjoyed this episode, check out the video of the full interview and the show notes at www.lewishowes.com/109.

  • TTMIK Level 1 Lesson 6 - What is this? This is...
    TalkToMeInKorean
    10:03
    Education
    144,441

    Start learning Korean today with TalkToMeInKorean's easy-to-follow audio lessons. The lessons are also accompanied by PDF lesson notes at http://talktomeinkorean.com

  • Peaky Blinders writer Steven Knight 2 Oct 2014
    The BBC Academy podcast
    14:28
    Blues
    9,277

    Peaky Blinders is not your typical English period drama. Writer and creator Steven Knight tells us how the series came about and how the tough characters and gritty stories take shape.

  • ENVP, Tabatha DeBruyn "Mastering Mindset to Build Momentum"
    ENVP, Donna Johnson
    36:45
    Business
    3,615

    spoken training

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